Voltage Regulator Plug

Discussion in 'Electrical' started by RedUltra02, Nov 14, 2011.

  1. RedUltra02

    RedUltra02 Member

    15
    0
    0
    Going to work and noticed my lights dimming and voltage swinging between 10-12 volts, normally at 14 volts. When I looked at things, I noticed that the plug for the regulator was not attached, the broken zip-tie was still there. On the way home, the voltage was swinging but ended up solid at 14 volts.

    This weekend I cleaned some oil out of the plug with electrical contact cleaner and put dielectric grease on the plug. Started the bike and still have 14 volts. If I continue to have problems, its onto the charging system sticky.

    Could the oil in the plug and the fact it wasn’t attached securely cause the swings I saw?

    Does the plug attach to the front or back of the cross piece between the frame, in front of the voltage regulator? I have no idea due to the broken zip--tie.
     
  2. glider

    glider Veteran Member

    25,464
    108
    44
    The bad connection can definitely cause the voltage swings that you saw. The fact that you have a solid 14V now is a good thing.
    There is also a problem with the oil from the primary migrating through the plug and into the wiring of the bike. Clean it out well and reattach it. As far as the position, that's not as important as where the wiring will plug back in with no strain on it, remember it's a rubber mounted engine and it moves a bit. Check the frame for the marks of where it was originally located.
     
  3. RedUltra02

    RedUltra02 Member

    15
    0
    0
    Thanks Glider. My thoughts on the oil was that it was due to a filter change.
     
  4. glider

    glider Veteran Member

    25,464
    108
    44
    That's always a possibility but the migration is also another common one too.
     
  5. dangerdan

    dangerdan Junior Member

    922
    26
    0
    Try not to get to any dielectric grease on the rubber plug. I put to much on mine and the plug popped off. After a thorough degreasing, I only used enough dielectric grease to coat the metal prongs.
     
  6. RedUltra02

    RedUltra02 Member

    15
    0
    0
    I used a Q-Tip and covered the prongs and then zip-tied the two halves together.
     
  7. R_W_B

    R_W_B Senior Member

    2,425
    0
    23
    I'm not familar with your model, but on my Dyna, muddy or wet dirt roads will leave evidence of splash residue up inside the regulator plastic caddy. If you ride in the rain often etc, you can just wrap the plug with electrical friction tape. That pretty much keeps stuff out of it.

    I do not mean electrical tape, don't use that or you will have a sticky mess next time you have to take it apart. It's pliable rubber product that molds to itself. Silicone tape also works good but is more expensive and harder to work with.

    My plug clips together, there is no zip tie. However I added zip ties to pull the wiring in tight to avoid rubbing on my oil cooler lines. Even with a rubber mount engine there is no flex of wires in my regulator area, but again you have a different model.
     
  8. lorne

    lorne Senior Member

    2,426
    58
    18
    i think the term is fiction tape. it is thicker than the black electrical tape and it is made by 3m. expensive but very good for the application.
     
  9. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

    18,544
    153
    399
    Keep an eye on that plug as The Boss said it could be oil migration, this has been an on going problem oil leak - Harley Davidson Community this talks about evos but it holds true for twin cams also
     
  10. RedUltra02

    RedUltra02 Member

    15
    0
    0
    Thanks for the feedback everyone!

    Just a couple of questions:
    1. Where can I pick up friction tape?

    2. Any idea of the o-ring size to work down to the rubber grommet?