Synthetic Oils In New Motors

Discussion in 'Oil' started by HarleyHarry, Jul 22, 2007.

  1. HarleyHarry

    HarleyHarry Banned

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    I'm sure that I am not the only one for who weight and all that on the oil is a bit too technical.
    Synthetic oil has less friction, is more evenly sized in it's molecules and so on.
    I've found this simple info on synth. oil at the Volvo website (my other passion)
    http://www.volvocars.com/salesandservices/maintenance/careforyourvolvo/oilschool/SyntheticOil.htm

    Give it a try and you'll see in simple terms what it is all about.
     
  2. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    Harry

    I agree with you there about oil being the topic of so many discussions and how passionate people get about oil. I have seen so many discussions taken to the "next level" about oil and it's benefits and how long you can run one oil compared to others. There's also one big company that takes it so far as to say that you can run their product for 25 K miles between changes. That idea just rubs me the wrong way entirely.

    The fact being that these same people that profess that it "works" better than brand X is something that I find amusing myself. Here's why I say that...

    If I were to take this persons bike that says "it did this and that" using brand ------- and change the oil to a brand that was down near the bottom of the list and they didn't know I changed the oil, I seriously doubt that person could really tell the difference in the running of the motor due to the change in oil.

    The main benefit of a good synthetic oil is being able to withstand higher operating temps without breaking down. Other than that, most any oil changed at regular/reasonable intervals with a filter, even dino oil will work just fine in most any motor.
     
  3. Not Very PC

    Not Very PC R.I.P

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    When your talking Harley Davidsons, Stock from the factory they are wet run on a machine at the end of assembly line that does not actually start and run the engine but instead hooks to the crank and spins the motor for 50 seconds to make sure oil pump is primed and rings seated.
    An engine heat cycles by being run and then cooling repeatedly, this will allow the engine parts to fit better as this cycling reduces stresses in the parts that were incurred during their manufacture and assembly.
    Synthetic oil in a new engine does not keep the engine from "breaking in" , in fact, because it allows a engine to heat slower and more evenly it will increase the life of the engine.
    My race motors are started on Mobile 1 from the very first.
    The assembly lube I use is WAY slicker and more shock proof then any oil.
     
  4. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    Great post PC

    Here's a few words from S&S on heat cycling for those who are interested.

    After careful assembly of your new engine, follow these important steps during initial start-up.

    1. Make sure you have oil pressure. Twin Cam engines pressurize the oil first, then run it through the oil filter before it starts to lubricate critical engine areas. The very last parts to see oil are the cylinder heads; coincidentally, the heads are quick to generate heat and need oil for lubrication and to carry heat away from these critical areas. For this reason, we highly recommend using 5W30 motor oil for priming and initial fire-up. During assembly, prime the lower end with a new oil filter in place (fill it with oil before installation), and be sure to pour some oil directly on the valve springs and valve stems. Leave the rocker lids off until you have verified oil flow to the rocker arms. Before starting the engine, cycle it in short bursts with the starter (plugs out but grounded). Install rocker lids after you have verified oil flow to the rocker area. Without oil, valve and guide damage can occur.<o:p></o:p>

    2. Start the engine in short stages (heat cycles). Perfect piston fit is a critical factor for engine performance and long engine life. An incredible amount of heat is generated between the rings, pistons and cylinders during initial start-up. It is at this point where clearances are the tightest and your rings, pistons and cylinders will meet for the first time. Follow the instructions below and you'll be rewarded with an engine that will last longer and perform better.

    DO NOT ESTIMATE TIME - USE A WATCH

    3. 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th fire-ups: These are very short run times! Each of these initial 4 start-ups should last only ten (10) seconds each at 1250 - 1400 rpms (just above idle speed). After each start-up, allow the cylinders to cool to room temperature. Don't rush it. Take your time. Your new parts need to get acquainted.

    4. 5th, 6th 7th and 8th fire-ups: Run times increase slightly. Run these 4 start-ups at 1250 - 1400 rpms, 15-20 seconds each, with time to cool to room temperature between each time.

    5. 9th, 10th and 11th fire-ups: With a fan blowing air at the engine, increase run times to 45 seconds each, again at 1250 -1400 rpms. Allow cooling to room temperature between runs, as before.

    6. Next 2 runs: No more than 1-1/2 minutes each. Continue to use a fan, but don't neglect the cooling period. These first few minutes of run time are critical to establish cylinder and piston wear patterns and to protect the rings from overheating. Remember: pistons don't die....they are murdered! The absolute worst thing you could do is start a fresh engine and let it idle, while you kick back and watch it melt from the inside out.

    7. Change the oil to 20/50 or 20/60 (hot summer). Now you can start the break-in
    process while riding the bike. Make your first rides short ones, with adequate.
    cooling stops along the way. Don't lug the engine and avoid stop-and-go traffic.
    Pick a route that will allow you to ride at moderate speeds, while shifting
    through the rpm range. Keep rpm levels moderate; increase them gradually
    as you log on the miles. Since your new engine will generate significantly
    more power, it will likely realize an increase in operating temperature. A
    quality oil cooler is also a smart investment and is highly recommended.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2007
  5. DDogg

    DDogg Junior Member

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    Very interesting read Glider. I wish I read this last August when I bought my Dyna. I babied it the first 1000 miles. Question. I know you've said in other posts but I now have 1400 miles on her. What oils (all three holes) would you recommend and is it to late to ensure my rings are sealed correctly? I appreciate you answers.
     
  6. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    I Like Mobil 1 V Twin in the engine, Spectro platinum six speed oil in the trans and performance+ from the dealer in the primary.

    As far as seating your rings in now, it' wouldn't hurt any thing but they have already taken a set to the shape of the cylinder.
     
  7. DDogg

    DDogg Junior Member

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    Thanks Glider.
     
  8. silentflyer

    silentflyer Active Member

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    With aircraft engines, whaich are air cooled, the usual deal is to brake them in, (seat the rings) with straight mineral oil, then after the rings are seated, switch to oils with additives. The theory is that the additives are to "slick" to get the the proper wear patterns in the jugs. My friend who has been bending wrenchs on aircraft engines for 60 years swears by this method....and he is the best wrench bender I know.
     
  9. DDogg

    DDogg Junior Member

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    O.K. now. I don't have to worry about seating the rings? This is done already. I bought a new FatBob and have been concerned ever since I read about the break in period. I babied my baby the first 1000 miles. Am I cool on seating the rings correctly.
     
  10. wrightj123

    wrightj123 Member

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    I will be picking up my bike at a the dealerss about 1 1/2 hours away from my house. The average speed limit is 50 and above. I would be a fool to jump on a bike with 1 mile on it with factory oil and drive it home that distance.

    If I read Gliders break-in procedure correctly I would be far better off having the dealer deliver the bike to me in a trailor (They are picking up my skirtster so thay are coming with an empty trailor).

    Should I also have them put Spectro synthetic in the bike before I pick it up?