SERT or just a download?

Discussion in 'Touring Models' started by crimsonultra, Dec 14, 2008.

  1. crimsonultra

    crimsonultra Member

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    I was told this is a good place for information. I have a 08 Ultra with monster ovals. I would like to finish off the stage I. My purchasing dealer told me that I need a High flow a/c with a SERT/dyno. I went to another dealer and they told me that all I need is the high flow a/c and a one time download to my ECM to let the ECM know about the air cleaner and exhuast, no SERT/dyno or even a Fuel Pack/PCIII etc. Who's right???
     
  2. Mr. Clean

    Mr. Clean Member

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    They are probably both right.

    Technically, with slipons and the Screamin' Eagle air cleaner, all you need is the Stage 1 download. These bike run lean as they are programmed at the factory to run at the EPA legal air fuel ratio of 14.7:1. As a result, they tend to run hot

    Slipons alone will most likely have little or no impact on the bikes performance or the A/F ratio. Adding the S/E air cleaner will definitely lean out the A/F ratio and cause the engine to run even hotter, possibly eventually damaging the engine, unless something is done to modify the settings in the ECM. With slipons and the S/E air cleaner, the Stage 1 download (a one-time pre-determined by the factory adjustment to the ECM) supposedly brings the A/F ratio back to 14.7. Your bike will run somewhat stronger, but not any cooler. The Stage 1 download costs $150 plus about 1/2 hour of labor to install.

    Using a SERT instead of the Stage 1 download allows a lot of adjustment to the ECM settings. It requires a significant amount of dyno time (approxinmately 3-4 hours) by a skilled operator to adjust the ECM settings so that your bike will run better and cooler. The SERT costs several hundred dollars (about $300-400), plus 3-4 hours of labor.

    There are many other options for making your bike run cooler and better, and there are twice as many opinions as to which is the best way to go.

    I am sure Glider will chime in on this, as he has his own recommendation.
     
  3. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    Like mentioned above, there are many ways of doing this. I suggest the TFI because it accomplishes what you are trying to do by adding fuel and it can be done by the owner of the bike with no dyno time. True that the SERT or the new TTS tuner does a lot more but it really isn't needed IMO. They run just fine with added fuel only and it's a lot easier on the bike than spending 3-4 hours on the dyno.

    Motorcycle Fuel Injection Kits and Electronic Fuel Injection Systems - EFI
     
  4. jkelley

    jkelley Member

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    Glider,

    I can't find the TTI for 2009 bikes. How much are they andhow do they function?
    I am getting ready to get a TTS form Doc but still interested.
    Thanks
    JK
     
  5. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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  6. crimsonultra

    crimsonultra Member

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    Ok guys I went to a third dealer and they said that they install a PCIII when they do a Stage I. So three dealers, three different responses. I would think that MoCo would have all there dealers on the same sheet of music. Am I right in assuming that the general school of thought on this forum is to stick with the Fuel Pak/PCIII/TFI route and avoid the SERT/Dyno. I have seen my dealer dyno someone else's Fatboy, and they were really beating the hell out of it on that dyno. I guess I just have to make a decison on which way to go thanks for the help. I'll keep checking to see if any one else chimes in.
     
  7. crimsonultra

    crimsonultra Member

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    Ok Hobbit/Glider let me ask you this, not that money is no object because it most certinly is. BUT if it were no object what would YOU do, dyno or TFI?
     
  8. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    If you're after the ultimate,then dyno, if you just want a streetable good running bike, TFI with a stage 1
     
  9. cdn-bigfoot

    cdn-bigfoot Junior Member

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    I've got a K&N High Flow in a Hypercharger and Cobra Speedster Short pipes. The ECM has been flashed.
    If I get a FuelPak or like TFI, do I need to return my ECM to stock program first?
     
  10. Retrop

    Retrop Active Member

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    I am not trying to tell anybody how to spend their money but it always seems to me like putting a $300.00 race tuner on a touring bike and then strapping it to a dyno for a couple of hours (another $300.00) is overkill. It is a little like owning a $300,000.00 Italina Lambougini that has 600 horsepower and is capable of cruising the open road at 160 mph when you live in a state that has a speed limit of 70 mph.
    I am with others in that a TFI will do everything you need it to do and won't leave you with a feeling like you have been taken to the cleaners for adding 10 horsepower to your bike. Most of us just want to cool the engine off and give us a boost in the seat of the pants at the same time. If, on the other hand you are going to be flat tracking your Ultra around a 1/2 mile oval for several hours, by all means go with the more complicated and expensive race tuners. If I am not mistaken, everytime a dealer installs a Harley Race Tuner on a new bike, the warranty automatically goes South. That tells me something right there.
    From the dealers perspective the most costly and dangerous piece of equipment sold in their place of business is the $60.00 shop manual. Once an owner has that in their possession they soon learn that basic upkeep on their bikes is not rocket science. I have alway urged all my riding friends to buy the shop manual and learn to do the maintenance themselves. Besides saving a couple hundred bucks everytime they change the oil, doing things yourself is a great reward in itself. I am always looking for one of those big signs out in front of my Harley dealer that SHOUTS...$29.00 oil changes. Haven't seen one yet. Leaving the heavy duty tasks to the dealer but learning to do the light weight stuff yourself can pay off big time down the road of life.