Putting the Torque to bolts

Discussion in 'General Harley Davidson Topic' started by xlcruser, Jun 19, 2009.

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Wet or Dry Bolt when using Torque wrench.

Poll closed Jun 22, 2009.
  1. Dry only

    5 vote(s)
    33.3%
  2. Wet only

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Loctite on threads

    10 vote(s)
    66.7%
  1. xlcruser

    xlcruser Active Member

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    Ok, I was asking about torque wrenches in another post and came across something I should of given more thought to. So I'll try a poll on it. When putting the torque wrench to the bike, do you do it to a dry bolt or wet? Now everybody seems to be in agreement on using lock tight, when doing so does that make it wet?
     
  2. Dr. Dolittle

    Dr. Dolittle Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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    Not sure I totally understand the question. You should always tighten to the torque values specified in the service manual or the accesory's included instruction sheet, whether you use loctite or not.
     
  3. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    This question was answered when you posted about it before. The torque is DRY unless otherwise specified in the manual for that bike. As far as the locktite, an anti seize used on the bolt would call for a wet torque so this is an interesting question.
    Most items on a bike that are designed to be assembled with loctite use the dried form of loctite, so avoiding the problem of that lubing the threads particularly.
    In general wet torque is about 25% less than dry, give or take.

    Here's a chart that gives some interesting info.

    Bolt Torque Chart | Portland Bolt
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2009
  4. xlcruser

    xlcruser Active Member

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    I'm kind of new to this so please bare with my ignorance or redundant questions. I didn't know locktite was in a dry form. I have used products before that were not. That being said, I didn't know if it would be considered a wet bolt as much as you and many others recommend using it. Don't I just feel all silly and red faced. :small3d023:
     
  5. Joyflyin

    Joyflyin Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator

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    Don't worry XLCruser, you're doing this for the team. :s I'm learning too. :) Until you brought it up, I had no idea that there would be a different value, or for that matter, a 'wet' or 'dry' bolt.....so thanks. :D
     
  6. gs34

    gs34 Junior Member

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    There is a difference. And, like Glider said, wet is usually about 25% greater than dry.
    Let's add this though.
    Generally, when we are talking wet & dry, we are speaking about the presence of lubrication on the threads. ie oil, anti-seize, moliubdium paste, STP, etc.
    Loctite is really not a lubricant.
    Where you can potentialy get in trouble is if you are torquing a lubricated bolt to the maximum value for that size bolt. You would in fact be overtorquing it and creating the potential for failure.
    Here again, as I have stated in several other threads on "Torque", What you are looking for with a torque qrench is repeatibility......getting all fasteners tightened to the same gripping force.....So, in order to achieve this, all fasteners must be in the same state....if one is dry, they must all be dry.
     
  7. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    Don't you mean less?
     
  8. fin_676

    fin_676 Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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    I would take the attitude that if the service manual states to apply loctite of a specific grade then the torque value given would be correct value for that application

    Brian
     
  9. gs34

    gs34 Junior Member

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    Yes Glider, Less. My mind wasn't seeing what my fingers were typing!!!:small3d007:
    And, while I am thinking about it, also remember the condition of the hole that you are putting the fastener into will come into play and effect the torque also.
    Always makesure the bolt hole is clean, dry, and the threads are in good shape.
    Liquid left in a blind hole....(a hole that is tapped in a housing that is not open at both ends).....can cause a hydraulic lock and not allow a fastener to be properly torqued
    Or, can cause the housing to be damaged by the hydraulic action and pressure caused by the bolt.

    Lots of stuff to think about and be aware of!!!!:newsmile082:
     
  10. xlcruser

    xlcruser Active Member

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    Thanks all, I've learned a bunch in just 10 little post. Ain't this place great?:newsmile106: