How do you ride the twisties?

Discussion in 'General Harley Davidson Topic' started by SteveB, Aug 6, 2008.

  1. SteveB

    SteveB Member

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    Just got back from a trip to West Virginia. Really great riding there....Had a blast riding the mountain twisties. I got a lotta respect for anyone who lives in the mountains and has to ride those roads on a regular basis. I could tell the wear and tear on the motorcycle has to be tremendous. Just wondering how you all (from the mountains) ride in the mountains. I was always taught to gear down and use the transmission as a brake while descending so as not to heat up brakes. Now I have been told that it is not good on the newer models to ride like that. I do not know why? this is what a friend told me. How do you ride the mountains?
     
  2. Joyflyin

    Joyflyin Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator

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    I have to agree with you on the beautiful country, however I won't be much help to answer your questions since I'm still learning myself. Got pix???? :D
     
  3. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    I think the problem with gearing down comes from the 96 engines with the crummy cranks. It really doesn't take a lot to give you excessive run out and after that, it's history.
     
  4. gs34

    gs34 Junior Member

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    Do you really believe that the cranks are so suspect that the use of downshift braking can cause a misalinment?
    Not being critical, I honestly want to know.
     
  5. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    There have been some that ride normal and not beat on the bike and have had the crank go on them. Hard acceleration or sudden downshifting like hitting the wrong gear (ie downshifting from 5th to 4th and hitting 3rd by mistake) can also do the damage with the sudden engine breaking much the same as burnouts and hard acceleration. It's just a poor design and press fitted together.
     
  6. SteveB

    SteveB Member

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    I certainly would hope that through "normal" usage the engine and transmission would hold up. Also, I do understand that this is a design flaw that is subject to fail. But on the other hand the only other alternative to downshifting while descending a slope would be braking and would that not cause excessive heat and wear and cause premature brake failure? I am a flatlander and I do enjoy the occasional trip to the mountains. My '07 EGC performed very well and I was riding two-up during the whole trip. I'm just trying to ride "efficiently" with the least amount of wear and tear.
     
  7. Dr. Dolittle

    Dr. Dolittle Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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    Time for my first dumb question of the day - do you mean the 1996 model year or the Twin Cam 96 motors? I think I know the answer but I've gotta ask anyway! Thanks Glider!
     
  8. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    That's the twin cam 96 engines. They leave a bit to be desired in some areas even with the improvements in other areas.
     
  9. gs34

    gs34 Junior Member

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    Well, that bites! Hate the thoughts of possibly having to rip the bottom end down to have the crank pinned and welded. All because HD decided to go cheaper, not better.
     
  10. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    The welding and re truing is what these cranks need to make a better engine. The went to the new cam chain setup which eliminated a weak link and built in another even bigger one.