Gulf Nightmare

Discussion in 'General OFF TOPIC' started by dogdad, May 1, 2010.

  1. dogdad

    dogdad Active Member

    So what do you all think about the wonderful oil leak we have here off of Louisiana?? I believe they should have gotten these oil companies to come up with a proven way to shut these wells off before they were allowed to drill in deep water. Better eat some shrimp , oysters , and crabs before it's all ruined. Going to hurt a lot of people,businesses,,even the restaurants down here.
  2. Labow

    Labow Member

    yes it will be. sure would help if that front would pick up some speed so the winds turn to the north sooner
  3. kemo

    kemo R.I.P

    I wish that they would stop drilling in the Gulf. It is proving too dangerous.
  4. Scrappy

    Scrappy Active Member

    this is tragic and needs to be fixed now!
  5. Redfish-Joe

    Redfish-Joe Senior Member

    Considering the thousands of platforms in the gulf in which everyone had to had a drilling rig set on, the number of incidents are very low. I agree that one incident is too many and one life lost in the process is too much. But the overall safety record in the gulf is about as good as it gets. I was a welder for Exxon for 8 years offshore. Every morning there was a safety meeting, before you started your assignment for the day there was a gang safety meeting and if the nature of your assignment changed, again a safety meeting.

    We need the oil and people need the jobs. Below is a list of spills through out the world since 1967.

    Oil Spills and Disasters

    The following list includes major oil spills since 1967. The circumstances surrounding the spill, amount of oil spilled, and the attendant environmental damage is also given.

    March 18, Cornwall, Eng.: Torrey Canyon ran aground, spilling 38 million gallons of crude oil off the Scilly Islands.

    Dec. 15, Buzzards Bay, Mass.: Argo Merchant ran aground and broke apart southeast of Nantucket Island, spilling its entire cargo of 7.7 million gallons of fuel oil.

    April, North Sea: blowout of well in Ekofisk oil field leaked 81 million gallons.

    March 16, off Portsall, France: wrecked supertanker Amoco Cadiz spilled 68 million gallons, causing widespread environmental damage over 100 mi of Brittany coast.

    June 3, Gulf of Mexico: exploratory oil well Ixtoc 1 blew out, spilling an estimated 140 million gallons of crude oil into the open sea. Although it is one of the largest known oil spills, it had a low environmental impact.

    July 19, Tobago: the Atlantic Empress and the Aegean Captain collided, spilling 46 million gallons of crude. While being towed, the Atlantic Empress spilled an additional 41 million gallons off Barbados on Aug. 2.

    March 30, Stavanger, Norway: floating hotel in North Sea collapsed, killing 123 oil workers.

    Feb. 4, Persian Gulf, Iran: Nowruz Field platform spilled 80 million gallons of oil.
    Aug. 6, Cape Town, South Africa: the Spanish tanker Castillo de Bellver caught fire, spilling 78 million gallons of oil off the coast.

    July 6, North Sea off Scotland: 166 workers killed in explosion and fire on Occidental Petroleum's Piper Alpha rig in North Sea; 64 survivors. It is the world's worst offshore oil disaster.

    Nov. 10, Saint John's, Newfoundland: Odyssey spilled 43 million gallons of oil.

    March 24, Prince William Sound, Alaska: tanker Exxon Valdez hit an undersea reef and spilled 10 million–plus gallons of oil into the water, causing the worst oil spill in U.S. history.

    Dec. 19, off Las Palmas, the Canary Islands: explosion in Iranian supertanker, the Kharg-5, caused 19 million gallons of crude oil to spill into Atlantic Ocean about 400 mi north of Las Palmas, forming a 100-square-mile oil slick.

    June 8, off Galveston, Tex.: Mega Borg released 5.1 million gallons of oil some 60 nautical miles south-southeast of Galveston as a result of an explosion and subsequent fire in the pump room.

    Jan. 23–27, southern Kuwait: during the Persian Gulf War, Iraq deliberately released 240–460 million gallons of crude oil into the Persian Gulf from tankers 10 mi off Kuwait. Spill had little military significance. On Jan. 27, U.S. warplanes bombed pipe systems to stop the flow of oil.

    April 11, Genoa, Italy: Haven spilled 42 million gallons of oil in Genoa port.

    May 28, Angola: ABT Summer exploded and leaked 15–78 million gallons of oil off the coast of Angola. It's not clear how much sank or burned.

    March 2, Fergana Valley, Uzbekistan: 88 million gallons of oil spilled from an oil well.

    Aug. 10, Tampa Bay, Fla.: three ships collided, the barge Bouchard B155, the freighter Balsa 37, and the barge Ocean 255. The Bouchard spilled an estimated 336,000 gallons of No. 6 fuel oil into Tampa Bay.

    Sept. 8, Russia: dam built to contain oil burst and spilled oil into Kolva River tributary. U.S. Energy Department estimated spill at 2 million barrels. Russian state-owned oil company claimed spill was only 102,000 barrels.

    Feb. 15, off Welsh coast: supertanker Sea Empress ran aground at port of Milford Haven, Wales, spewed out 70,000 tons of crude oil, and created a 25-mile slick.

    Dec. 12, French Atlantic coast: Maltese-registered tanker Erika broke apart and sank off Britanny, spilling 3 million gallons of heavy oil into the sea.

    Jan. 18, off Rio de Janeiro: ruptured pipeline owned by government oil company, Petrobras, spewed 343,200 gallons of heavy oil into Guanabara Bay.

    Nov. 28, Mississippi River south of New Orleans: oil tanker Westchester lost power and ran aground near Port Sulphur, La., dumping 567,000 gallons of crude oil into lower Mississippi. Spill was largest in U.S. waters since Exxon Valdez disaster in March 1989.

    Nov. 13, Spain: Prestige suffered a damaged hull and was towed to sea and sank. Much of the 20 million gallons of oil remains underwater.

    July 28, Pakistan: The Tasman Spirit, a tanker, ran aground near the Karachi port, and eventually cracked into two pieces. One of its four oil tanks burst open, leaking 28,000 tons of crude oil into the sea.

    Dec. 7, Unalaska, Aleutian Islands, Alaska: A major storm pushed the M/V Selendang Ayu up onto a rocky shore, breaking it in two. 337,000 gallons of oil were released, most of which was driven onto the shoreline of Makushin and Skan Bays.

    Aug.-Sept., New Orleans, Louisiana: The Coast Guard estimated that more than 7 million gallons of oil were spilled during Hurricane Katrina from various sources, including pipelines, storage tanks and industrial plants.

    June 19, Calcasieu River, Louisiana: An estimated 71,000 barrels of waste oil were released from a tank at the CITGO Refinery on the Calcasieu River during a violent rain storm.

    July 15, Beirut, Lebanon: The Israeli navy bombs the Jieh coast power station, and between three million and ten million gallons of oil leaks into the sea, affecting nearly 100 miles of coastline. A coastal blockade, a result of the war, greatly hampers outside clean-up efforts.

    August 11th, Guimaras island, The Philippines: A tanker carrying 530,000 gallons of oil sinks off the coast of the Philippines, putting the country's fishing and tourism industries at great risk. The ship sinks in deep water, making it virtually unrecoverable, and it continues to emit oil into the ocean as other nations are called in to assist in the massive clean-up effort.

    December 7, South Korea: Oil spill causes environmental disaster, destroying beaches, coating birds and oysters with oil, and driving away tourists with its stench. The Hebei Spirit collides with a steel wire connecting a tug boat and barge five miles off South Korea's west coast, spilling 2.8 million gallons of crude oil. Seven thousand people are trying to clean up 12 miles of oil-coated coast.

    July 25, New Orleans, Louisiana: A 61-foot barge, carrying 419,000 gallons of heavy fuel, collides with a 600-foot tanker ship in the Mississippi River near New Orleans. Hundreds of thousands of gallons of fuel leak from the barge, causing a halt to all river traffic while cleanup efforts commence to limit the environmental fallout on local wildlife.

    March 11, Queensland, Australia: During Cyclone Hamish, unsecured cargo aboard the container ship MV Pacific Adventurer came loose on deck and caused the release of 52,000 gallons of heavy fuel and 620 tons of ammonium nitrate, a fertilizer, into the Coral Sea. About 60 km of the Sunshine Coast was covered in oil, prompting the closure of half the area's beaches.

    Jan. 23, Port Arthur, Texas: The oil tanker Eagle Otome and a barge collide in the Sabine-Neches Waterway, causing the release of about 462,000 gallons of crude oil. Environmental damage was minimal as about 46,000 gallons were recovered and 175,000 gallons were dispersed or evaporated, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.

    April 24, Gulf of Mexico: The Deepwater Horizon, a semi-submersible drilling rig, sank on April 22, after an April 20th explosion on the vessel. Eleven people died in the blast. When the rig sank, the riser—the 5,000-foot-long pipe that connects the wellhead to the rig—became detached and began leaking oil. In addition, U.S. Coast Guard investigators discovered a leak in the wellhead itself. As much as 5,000 barrels (200,000 gallons) of oil per day were leaking into the water, threatening wildlife along the Louisiana Coast. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano declared it a "spill of national significance." As many as 1,000 people and dozens of ships and aircraft were enlisted to help in the cleanup. BP (British Petroleum), which leased the Deepwater Horizon, is responsible for the cleanup, but the U.S. Navy supplied the company with resources to help contain the slick. If the slick reaches the coastline, it could dwarf the Exxon Valdez in terms of environmental damage.

    NEWHD74FAN Experienced Member Retired Moderators

    Just to keep things in perspective, 1 cup of crude oil in your home swimming pool would make the water unfit to can guess how much more would be lethal water fowl or fish were in there.
  7. glider

    glider Veteran Member

    WHO drinks swimming pool water anyway? :lolrolling
  8. fin_676

    fin_676 Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

    I drank gallons of it when i was learning to swim i seem to remember but that was a long time ago

  9. walleye

    walleye Junior Member Contributor

    Nobody likes this tragety, but we all sure like to live the lifestyle that most of us do that requires petroleum. The energy companies do all they can to avoid these accidents and I agree even one is too many. But I am not for stopping drilling. Being dependant on foreign oil is far more dangerous than the risks involved in domestic exploration. There are safegards in place to prevent these types of accidents, obviously something or somebody failed. It should never have happened and should not be allowed to happen again. There are plenty of area's onshore to explore that are less dangerous to life and environment. Remember, we have accidents in the space programs, Nuclear plants, mining industries, refineries, on the highways daily and countless other examples. We can't simply stop, we just have to keep getting better. My thoughts and prayers are with the families that lost people as a result of this. JMO.
  10. larryjmiller

    larryjmiller Junior Member

    Good thing it floats on water. I think the critters below will be OK. We could jerk both knees and stop ALL drilling, all refining, all power plants, etc. Oh wait! we wouldn't be able to ride our HDs. The oil companies don't do this on purpose. Stuff happens. This isn't a perfect world.