2003 Heritage Softail No Start

Discussion in 'Electrical' started by ROADKING107, Sep 14, 2016.

  1. ROADKING107

    ROADKING107 Member

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    Hi my father recently purchased his first Harley (after 20 years of me nagging) it is a 2003 Heritage Softail with less than 10,000 miles. the other day he went to ride and when he turned ignition on nothing. He had no lights on dash or front of bike and fuel pump would not come on. So I went over to help I first checked power battery was fully charged. I then checked fuses. after I removed and cleaned switch but no change. I removed the switch from my bike and several times it would power up lights and fuel pump came on but as soon as I hit start button it would lose everything. I did notice when in accessory position dash and park lights would come on! this bike was always dealer serviced by prior owner and my father has put enough miles on it yet for next service. Any and all help is greatly appreciated!
     
  2. Jeff Klarich

    Jeff Klarich Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I'd start with a load test of the battery. Check and clean all battery connections and re tighten to include at the starter.
     
  3. ROADKING107

    ROADKING107 Member

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    Thanks Jeff I did remove and clean all connections from battery to starter and visable grounds but have not load tested battery! I often over think things and overlook some of the basics thank you so much!
     
  4. Jeff Klarich

    Jeff Klarich Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Intermittent power is usually a battery issue or a power or ground problem. A load test will tell you if the battery is up to snuff.

    Good luck.
     
  5. ROADKING107

    ROADKING107 Member

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    it has always has dash and park light when accessory position that kinda threw me off
     
  6. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

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    Check your grounds either with a test light or ohm meter, make sure your regulator is grounding, Softails still shake enough to cause a bad ground

    Regulator Bleed Test:
    Be sure regulator is connected to battery. Unplug regulator connector at engine crankcase. Use a trouble light and touch one probe to a known good ground and the other to the regulator pins, one at a time. If the light glows, replace regulator. You can use a voltage meter the same way, there should be no voltage on either wire.
    Make sure to do this test also once you get the bike running
    A fully charged battery after sitting for a couple hours should read 12.7 volts, if not replace it
    1. Battery Test:The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.

    2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).

    3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there’s a failed component.

    4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).

    • AC Output Check:
    1. Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
    2. Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
    3. Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
    4. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
    5. Generic Specs:
    • 22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    • 32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    • 45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    • Stator Resistance Check:
    1. Switch your multi meter to Ohm x 1 scale.
    2. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on meter.
    3. Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
    4. Generic Specs:
    • 22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
    • 32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
    • 45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
    • Stator IB test or Ground Check:
    1. Switch your multi meter to Ohm x 1 scale.
    2. Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on multi meter and the negative to ground.
    3. There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
    4. If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
    5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.

    • Identifying Wires:
    1. Battery Charge Lead– Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
    2. AC output leads– Wires coming from the Stator to regulator.
    3. Ground– Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
    • Regulator Ground Test: Insure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tight to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
    • Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
    1. Switch multi meter to Diode Scale.
    2. Place your Multi meter positive lead on each AC output wire.
    3. Place your multi meter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
    4. The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    5. Next, switch your multi meter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
    6. The reading should be Infinite.
    7. With your meter on the same setting, place your multi meter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
    8. The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    9. Next, switch your multi meter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
    10. The reading should be Infinite.
    11. Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
    Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
    AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
    AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
    Battery charge lead AC output 1 ∞
    Battery charge lead AC output 2 ∞
    Ground AC output 1 Voltage
    Ground AC output 2 Voltage
    AC output 1 Ground ∞
    AC output 2 Ground ∞
    Here is the complete test
     
  7. BikeSAG

    BikeSAG Active Member

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    Had the same problem on my 2007
    My symptoms were: Dash and lights would come on when the accessory switch on the tank was turned on. Fuel pump would not prime when the ignition switch on the handle bar was turned on. Replaced switch and problem solved.
     
  8. ROADKING107

    ROADKING107 Member

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    Thanks BikeSAG but as I said I put switch out of my bike and same issues was there. And my bike stats fine old switch
     
  9. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

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    If your battery falls below 10 volts during starting, buy a new one, charge it @ 2 amps over night, install it and check the charging system



    Regulator Bleed Test:
    Be sure regulator is connected to battery. Unplug regulator connector at engine crankcase. Use a trouble light and touch one probe to a known good ground and the other to the regulator pins, one at a time. If the light glows, replace regulator. You can use a voltage meter the same way, there should be no voltage on either wire.
    Make sure to do this test also once you get the bike running
    A fully charged battery after sitting for a couple hours should read 12.7 volts, if not replace it
    1. Battery Test:The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.

    2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).

    3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there’s a failed component.

    4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).

    • AC Output Check:
    1. Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
    2. Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
    3. Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
    4. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
    5. Generic Specs:
    • 22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    • 32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    • 45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    • Stator Resistance Check:
    1. Switch your multi meter to Ohm x 1 scale.
    2. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on meter.
    3. Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
    4. Generic Specs:
    • 22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
    • 32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
    • 45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
    • Stator IB test or Ground Check:
    1. Switch your multi meter to Ohm x 1 scale.
    2. Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on multi meter and the negative to ground.
    3. There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
    4. If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
    5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.

    • Identifying Wires:
    1. Battery Charge Lead– Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
    2. AC output leads– Wires coming from the Stator to regulator.
    3. Ground– Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
    • Regulator Ground Test: Insure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tight to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
    • Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
    1. Switch multi meter to Diode Scale.
    2. Place your Multi meter positive lead on each AC output wire.
    3. Place your multi meter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
    4. The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    5. Next, switch your multi meter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
    6. The reading should be Infinite.
    7. With your meter on the same setting, place your multi meter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
    8. The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    9. Next, switch your multi meter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
    10. The reading should be Infinite.
    11. Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
    Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
    AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
    AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
    Battery charge lead AC output 1 ∞
    Battery charge lead AC output 2 ∞
    Ground AC output 1 Voltage
    Ground AC output 2 Voltage
    AC output 1 Ground ∞
    AC output 2 Ground ∞
    Here is the complete test
     
  10. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

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    Nope, wrong again, you need to start with a fresh battery and work backwards, it may be a bad switch or in the fuel system, ya got to think before you post so not to give mis information like I have a few times, but I am right more than I am wrong, it comes from years of wrenching, that is all I do and I do it as good as I can with very few complaints and repeat customers