scratch repair

Discussion in 'Touring Models' started by GGMach1, Aug 29, 2009.

  1. GGMach1

    GGMach1 Member

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    After being parked for a couple of hours the other day I came out to my bike and noticed a pretty deep scratch that runs the entire length of my left saddle bag. Does anyone have a suggestion on how to repair and touch up the paint on my bag? Or, a recommendation on a product that will fill the scratch and not be so noticable.
     
  2. Rewind

    Rewind Active Member

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    If it goes all the way to the bag itself, you will probably have to have it repainted.
     
  3. GGMach1

    GGMach1 Member

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    it does
     
  4. NEWHD74FAN

    NEWHD74FAN Experienced Member Retired Moderators

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    GGMach1...Well, the good news, is if it is only through the clear coat, you can probably have it done (or do it yourself with a bit of help from Steve07 or Whatyardwork who have lots of knowledge) in this regard...or have it done professionally with the assurance that it can be done without "muss or fuss" in using proper paint supplies and honest to gosh hands on help. Just do your homework and get several estimates and wait for those guys (or PM them) for a weighted response you can go to your paint shop pro with...! JMHO BTW your avatar has an interesting pix of your "glide"...:D
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2009
  5. whatyardwork

    whatyardwork Banned

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    Harley does sell small touch up bottles that are pretty cheap and in all colors.Black and solid colors can be touched up rather easily. Silver,gold or 3 stage paints {red hot sunglow} are not going to be so simple.Metallic flake is polished on one side so when sprayed from a gun you are trying to get the flake to lay down giving it that brilliant sparkle. A brush tends to stand flake up leaving it streaky and exposing the darker unpolished side of the flake.

    Using a fine brush apply a couple of coats inside the scratch. Be patient and allow each coat to dry,try keeping it only inside the scratch.The idea is to build up some layers to fill up the scratch.If your hand is not that steady you can use a rubber block and 2000 grit wet paper to remove any paint outside the scratch. Once good coverage is achieved apply a coat of urethane based clearcoat again using a fine brush.It is not as important to keep the clear inside the scratch as it will blend in with the clear already on the bike.

    When finished you want the clearcoat layer to be raised slightly. Allow the clear to dry overnight at at least 65 degrees. Once dry take a NEW razor blade and apply masking tape to the last 1/2 inch on the outer edges of the blade.This will prevent the corners of the blade from contacting the undamaged area. Keeping the blade flat, smoothly drag it in one direction across the raised clearcoat straight up in a flat position to the panel.You will notice white material being removed, thats excess clearcoat. Trust me this is OK.You should see the raised clearcoat {only the raised clearcoat} as a white line.Continue with the blade until the the clear you applied starts to become level with the existing clear on the bike. If you start to remove clear from outside the touched up area its time to stop with the blade.

    Now that you've gone as far as recommended with the blade its time to wet sand.Using 2000 grit wet paper and a rubber block sand the area smooth. Once smooth use a buffer and some medium grade compound and buff.It generally takes 3 to 4 applications of compound before all the scratches are gone and you realize that crazy razor blade idea actually worked. Follow this by polishing and you're done. If you end up with low areas in the scratch simply apply more clear and repeat.

    Clearcoat will hide any scratch 1000 grit or finer so if you start sanding with 2000 and realize you need more clear stop sanding. Before applying additional clear make sure to throughly clean the affected area as trapped wet sand residue will remain white. You wont see the scratches you just made so don't worry. The idea is to remove as little of the bikes original clearcoat as possible.

    Hope this helps.


    When I originally wrote this I wanted to clarify a couple of things after reading it but the elapsed time for editing had expired. Then the wife stepped in. Oh well cant argue with her wanting to go for a ride.

    1. When I said keep the blade flat what I mean is straight up in a flat position to the panel.
    2. Before applying additional clear make sure to throughly clean the affected area as trapped wetsand residue will remain white.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 30, 2009
  6. Breeze3at

    Breeze3at Well-Known Member

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    Excellent instructions! I'm gonna try it on a scratch on my truck today. Luckily, the bike doesn't have any scratches to try it on (yet).
     
  7. Doug_09ultra

    Doug_09ultra Junior Member

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    Whatyardwork- excellent instructions! You should do a photo layout for the self-help section. I'm sure it would be one of the more "viewed" ones there. Everyone gets scratches from time to time. Most of us don't attempt the repair because we don't know how to start.
     
  8. whatyardwork

    whatyardwork Banned

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    I'll work on that.Generaly when I get 1 too many scratches,I repaint.Just trying to offer back for the many things Ive taken from this sight.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. NEWHD74FAN

    NEWHD74FAN Experienced Member Retired Moderators

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    Great looking paint there...:bigsmiley12:
     
  10. GGMach1

    GGMach1 Member

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    Thanks for the instructions, I'll try it and let you know how it turns out.