How to pull a clutch stuck on the shaft?

Discussion in 'Touring Models' started by CropdusterDoug, May 8, 2011.

  1. CropdusterDoug

    CropdusterDoug Member

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    I've go a noisy bearing in the main gear shaft, but decided to buy the transmission rebuild kit and do the whole thing. The problem is, is that the clutch won't slide off the the transmission shaft? I've even used a puller, but the thing won't budge? I'm afraid to use too much force and strip out the bolts holes or maybe even crack the aluminum clutch housing. I was under the impression, per the factory manual, that the clutch would have just slid off, but it didn't? Does anybody have any ideas? If not, then I'll use a torch to heat the aluminum housing around the shaft while tightening up on the puller. After all, the worse I can do is ruin it...which I don't want to do.
     
  2. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

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  3. CropdusterDoug

    CropdusterDoug Member

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    Thanks, guys. I didn't know about the tapered shaft. Okay, I'll treat it as such. In the past, with working on other equipment having tapered shafts, sometimes if I just leave the gear or pully under tension at the end of the day, I'd return the next morning to find that the gear or pully had popped off during the night. I thought that was interesting. I may have to do that with this one. Thanks again.

    Doug
     
  4. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

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    If you have the puller on give it a smack on the end with a hammer it should pop off:s
     
  5. fin_676

    fin_676 Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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    That trick has worked for me in the past

    Brian
     
  6. CropdusterDoug

    CropdusterDoug Member

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    Yup, that's what it took. I also used a tire bead breaker to add some outward pressure to the hub, and then gave the puller a couple of moderate blows. The hub popped loose after the second blow. It's just that hammering mechanical components goes against my grain. Years ago I used to do engine machine work: rerboring and sleeving cylinders; grinding crankshafts, etc. One blow of a mechanic's hammer could make the difference with a few thousands of an inch tolerance unseen to the mechanic. Anyway, I cringed and did what you guys recommended, and it worked with no damage! Thanks again! :small3d028: That bearing on the shaft has to be replaced anyway.:p