Exhaust Pipe Blueing

Discussion in 'Touring Models' started by 07ROADKING, Nov 30, 2007.

  1. 07ROADKING

    07ROADKING Active Member

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    MY 2007 ROADKING CLASSIC with a fact HD oilcooler will run 230 on a 70 deg day the oil temp has been as high as 270 on a 90 deg day in stop and go traffic . the bike gets very slugish at this temp.{im using the Digital Dip stick not sure how accurate it is} this bike now has 7600 miles on it.it has no mods it is all stock. could the timming be doing this.also the mpg is only 33-37 mpg :33: on the highway 70-75 mph. my 2005 RKC was getting 42-45 mpg
     
  2. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    I moved your post here because the forum you asked your question in is for replying to a self help topic already posted in there.

    As for your question, the timing could be the partial cause but the fuel mixture being so lean for EPA is more likely the cause here. You can choose to leave it stock or add a tuner of your choice which would more than likely help you out here. Other mods like slip ons and stage one will flow more air and help also.
    Your dipstick can be checked by boiling some water and putting the tip of the unit in the water. It should read 212*. If it varies from this, that's how much it is off.
    Synthetic oil will also protect your engine better at those temps. It does not break down like regular oil will.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2007
  3. Not Very PC

    Not Very PC R.I.P

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    Sounds like it's so lean it's fighting for it's life.
     
  4. txhawg

    txhawg Member

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    I don't think that test is really accurate. Boiling can begin at 212. Physics suggests that water can get significantly hotter than 212 degrees. It's called superheated water.
     
  5. wildspirit97

    wildspirit97 Senior Member

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    you get super heated water in a from putting distilled water in a microwave. it can actually explode when you open the door and the air hits it. the lack of minerals in the water keep the water from coming to a boil in the microwave but once the cool air outside hits the "super heated" water in can explode. on a stove top I think it unlikely you would be able to super heat your water. If you wanted to verify you could double check it with a 2 dollar meat theremometer and compare the reading on the dipstick.
     
  6. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    Try it and see if you can get the temp above 212* :D
     
  7. txhawg

    txhawg Member

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    I'll need to get a thermometer and try it. It will be interesting to see what happens. Just going by what I was taught. Superheated water is any water that is heated above 212, it does not have to be distilled. I also know that altitude will affect the boiling point. Water will boil at a lower temp at higher altitudes.
     
  8. Not Very PC

    Not Very PC R.I.P

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    Ok the wife's $79 sunbeam Digital cooking thermometer says rolling boil water is 212.3 -212.5 as long as you only touch the water, Stove on high water given 2 min at a full boil before temp taken, 2 more min. gave same readings. :60:
     
  9. Sharky1948

    Sharky1948 Junior Member

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    As others have indicated, to superheat water it must be:

    1. Free of impurities...the impurities create "starting points" for the boiling, sort of like putting a string in super-saturated sugar water to create sugar candy

    2. Still...if it's rocking around, it will disturb molecules sufficiently to boil, regardless of whether it is free of impurities

    3. In a container that doesn't have an irregular surface. Again, that the irregular surface creates a disturbance to start boiling.

    About the only way it happens in a home (as Glider suggested) is heating distilled water in a glass container in a microwave. Introducing a spoon or disturbing the container can cause "explosive" boiling.

    So, I think the suggestion to calibrate using boiling water is a pretty safe bet! (Just like the thermometer on my gas grill suggests as a way to calibrate.)

    More than you ever wanted to know about the physics of boiling... :s
     
  10. 07ROADKING

    07ROADKING Active Member

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    Thanks glider. i am using synthetic oil Ams oil 20-50 also using HD oilcooler. the tech at Kellys house of HD tells me all the 2007 are this lean to meet EPA standerds. but at this rate i dont think it will last to long i got to cool it down. ill most likley go with the stag 1 thanks to all who helped