Bike Died

Discussion in 'Electrical' started by MBHD93, Oct 16, 2010.

  1. MBHD93

    MBHD93 Member

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    I was at a stoplight and noticed my turn signal not working. I made the turn and the bike began to misfire badly. I pulled over and the bike died. No power to anything. I checked all the connections as best I could at the time. Nothing. After about ten minutes I noticed that I had electrical power again. The bike fired up but then began to misfire and died. Once again, no electrical power to anything. About twenty minutes later, I had power again and the bike also started. But same problem happened before I could get out of the parking lot.

    Brought bike home in the back of a friends truck. Of course when I got it home, there was power and the bike started. I let it run for about five minutes, then shut it off.

    Is it possible that the main breaker could be bad? I'm open to any suggestions. All connections are good and clean.
     
  2. trvlr

    trvlr Junior Member

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    how old's that battery? do you have an onboard voltmeter and what's the charging voltage when your bike is running at idle and at cruising speed? hook up a voltmeter to your battery and if it drops below 9.v or so on during startup - take that battery to auto zone, pep boys, etc and have it load tested - as a start. Battery good you'll want to know what your charging voltage is while in operation.
     
  3. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

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    First thing I would check, followed by battery connections, and charging system
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 17, 2010
  4. trvlr

    trvlr Junior Member

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    MBHD93 - there's a post 5 or 6 posts down from this one titeld "voltage regulator" - a good read that my assist you on your issue.
     
  5. Hoople

    Hoople Account Removed

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    Even if the main circuit breaker was still "Good", I would change it out for the more modern Maxi Fuse. Those bi-metal resettable circuit breakers all will fail at some time and it's just not worth the headache. Today there is so much better available..

    It requires special equipment to test those circuit breakers. It can not be done with a simple ohm meter.:)