Wrap Baffles

Discussion in 'Engine, Fuel and Exhaust' started by tlyoungb, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. tlyoungb

    tlyoungb Junior Member

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    I was searching the internet looking for Wrapping to go around some exhaust baffles. Well I can across this one site were someone used Stove Pipe Rope instead of the regular Fiberglass Exhaust wrapping.

    What would be the drawbacks if any on using Stove Pipe Rope. I mean it can withstand a huge amount of heat, and someone stated it would even last longer.

    Any comments?
     
  2. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    If it's what I'm thinking it's more restrictive than the standard baffle wrapping and would make more resistance to flow in the mufflers. From there you can see what happens.
     
  3. tlyoungb

    tlyoungb Junior Member

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    Which is like putting stock slip-ons your bike. Correct? I know I put the wrapping around the Baffles because without the wrapping it was just way to loud, and the older folks in the hood here were not liking it all that much.
     
  4. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    More or less yes. It's like going backwards. More backpressure than needed to run properly only hurts, not helps.
     
  5. tlyoungb

    tlyoungb Junior Member

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    Hey Glider, I know what you are saying, but the Wild Pig Slip-ons are the thru pipes. They are not like the stock pipes. You can see right thru them. Still has to be less back pressure than the stock pipes. Wouldn't you think? The stock pipes you can't even see thru to the other end. It looks like they have some kind of diviter that moves the exhaust up and around the baffles, but these wild pig slip ons just go thru. Not sure how the exhaust is diverted up thru the baffles.
     
  6. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    OK I was thinking of the baffles that the flow goes through the wrap unlike what you are saying with the straight through baffles. Using that type of wrap will probably remove any sound deadening that you would get from the regular baffle wrap through the perforated core . It would more than likely have less sound absorption than the regular wrap.
     
  7. Classynomad

    Classynomad Account Removed

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    I recently repacked mine with a roll of that foil-backed fiberglass, about 4" wide and 26' long. Cut it in half and used 13' each side on the thru-type baffle. The material was very similar to the original stuff, which was baked and beginning to come apart and move around. The tone changed very little, but it DID get "boxier" sounding, in a good way that is really appropriate for the TourGlide. Kinda like a loud Rinehart. They were pretty loud to begin with and it didn't quiet it down any, but I get compliments galore on the sound, and performance is excellent. It seemed to restore a marginal amount of back-pressure, which again, was good.

    Overall, it worked out very well for me, and I only spent about $6 for the roll of stuff at Lowe's, Home Depot, or whichever one of those places I got it, in the plumbing section where they have all the stuff for wrapping pipes, water heater blankets, etc.

    Happy Motorin'! -F-
     
  8. whiterider

    whiterider Active Member

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    I've been thinking about doing the opposite, unwrapping my SE slip ons. How much force is need to extract the baffles once the *tamper proof* torx bolts are removed?
     
  9. Classynomad

    Classynomad Account Removed

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    Probably depends how old they are, what kind of condition they're in... Mine were pretty new and I was able to ease the right one out, but had to pull the left one off and use a rod stuck through the inlet end, did the bang-bang thing on the driveway, and it came out. If they are a challenge to get out, you may want to wire-brush them where they make contact with the inside of the pipe and spray a little veinerschlipper on it to help it slide back in. And, make sure the bolt hole is lined up in case it wedges itself in upon reassembly. Then you can use an alignment punch to center the holes once it's in far enough. Just be careful not to overshoot the hole if it's a tight reinsertion. No need to pick a battle you don't really need to have.

    Happy Motorin'! -F-
     
  10. whiterider

    whiterider Active Member

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    Cheers. I'll give it a go this weekend.