Where to locate straps for securing EGC to trailer

Discussion in 'General Harley Davidson Topic' started by trvlr, Jul 25, 2012.

  1. trvlr

    trvlr Junior Member

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    Hi folks - doing my first trailering of my 08 ElectraGlide and have question on where to locate straps for securing.

    Due to room constraints, I'd like to keep the lowers and saddle bags on the bike. Where's best to locate the front straps? I was looking at wrapping a strap around the lower area of the triple-tree area around the front forks, but theres a piece of chrome trim that looks like has the potential to get damaged. Crash bars look like may be too low an attach point, but may be wrong on that. Looking for where best to strap up to on the fronts.

    On the rear, thought Id attach to the saddle bag crash bar. If not a good spot, please advise. Much obliged for any assistance -
     
  2. Jennmarr

    Jennmarr Junior Member

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    Use soft ties at each connection point on the bike. If you have a good wheel chock it will do most of the work of supporting the bike, then all you really need the straps for is to stabilize the bike and keep it from backing out of the wheel chock. That said, you can attach your ties to the top of the engine guard and angle them out toward the corners of the trailer. Attach near the intersection of the frame downtubes. Right side of the bike to left side of trailer and left side of bike to right side of trailer. Then the ties on the saddlebag guards to the side of the trailer just add a little more insurance.
     
  3. ironmark

    ironmark Junior Member

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    You do NOT need to waste $$$ on soft ties. When buying straps to tie down your bike all you need is 10ft rachet straps. Using 1 rachet strap per tie down point take the rachet strap and hook both S-hooks to the same D-ring or other tie down point on the trailer floor, make sure to hook the S-hook of the long strap to the D-ring first then hook the S-hook on the rachet to the same D-ring this way the rachet is on top and easy to access, then take the long strap and run it over the top of the bottom triple tree and then feed the long strap through the slot on the rachet and tighten the strap. Doing it this way you already have a soft tie by looping the strap, if the bike is the only thing that is in the trailer then there is no need to tie down the rear of the bike unless it just makes you feel better. I haul my bike from Michigan to Arizona and back every year and that is how I do it and I haven't had any issues.
     
  4. Jennmarr

    Jennmarr Junior Member

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    That method will certainly work, but the use of soft ties also protects your ratchet straps. If one gets damaged, a soft tie is much cheaper to replace than a good ratchet strap.
     
  5. 2000classic

    2000classic Active Member

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    I slip the straps between the fender and the forks. Makes the bike rock solid and allows the bike suppension to continue to function as it should. Rear straps around the rear foot pegs, but just snug enough to keep the rear of the bike from going side to side. Have never had even one strap loosen!
     
  6. trvlr

    trvlr Junior Member

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    thanks fellas - appreciate the assist.

    Im thinking either the fender/fork intersect, or the front frame downtubes where that stabilizer brace is welded on.

    The triple-tree like I said has a chrome trim piece on my bike that I think the straps are going to hit/lift. Haven't tried strapping it up yet, so not sure if it's in the way or not. The lower engine guard might work too.

    Appreciate the help. I dig some digging here and the net and couldnt find anything that talked to tying a dresser with fairing and lowers down. So appreciate the help.
     
  7. y2kflhr

    y2kflhr Active Member

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    I have the mak daddy straps from eastern performance

    I run the good straps on the lower triple tree in front, then some basic straps from the saddlebag rail to the back, and from the front frame (at the cross where above the regulator) to the back to keep the bike from rocking back and forth works like a charm
     
  8. Midnight Reign

    Midnight Reign Active Member

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    I do like 2000Classic does, but I add some soft padding as extra insurance against scuffing anything up. If you use this method you MUST have a good wheel chock, as with most scenario's it is the wheel chock that does most of the work. And as he said the rear straps need not be real tight, just snug enough to keep the bike from skipping side to side. The great thing about this method is it allows the bike to ride on its own suspension, as well as the trailer suspension, giving it the softest ride possible. And I guess it is worth mentioning that the front staps should be nice and tight, you should not be able to move the front wheel in any direction
     
  9. rossn2

    rossn2 Member

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  10. 2000classic

    2000classic Active Member

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    I agree regarding a good wheel chock! Just want to add that its those front straps that your counting on to keep things in place. I went with quality straps and for added insurance I put two on each side. One could snap, but chances of two snapin are pretty slim!:)