Wheel Bearing Tool

Discussion in 'Wheels' started by coopernicus, Jul 30, 2016.

  1. coopernicus

    coopernicus Junior Member Contributor

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    Hey, I'm getting ready to put some new wheels on my bike and was wondering if there is a way to put the bearings in without buying the tool from H.D. I know there must be a simpler way:confused: This is new to me so forgive my ignorance:eek:
     
  2. joel

    joel Junior Member

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    I have never installed bearings on a scooter but many in the automotive field.
    So these are ideas.
    Long brass punch to push them out.
    Than use the old bearing as the adapter on top of the new bearing, this allows the outter races to make contact as you tap them back in the wheel.
    I do it this way when installing new bearings on axles and carrier bearings.
    If the bearing is resessed in the wheel you can match a socket to the outter race, but small enough for clearance so it does't get stuck.
     
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  3. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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    You will need a blind-hole bearing puller. You can search on the Internet to find a used one, or try places like George's Garage for a one reasonably priced. Hard if not impossible to do without this sort of tool.

    http://www.georges-garage.com/chassis_tools.htm

    Cheers,

    TQ
     
  4. coopernicus

    coopernicus Junior Member Contributor

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    TQ I won't be needing to pull bearings, just putting new bearings in new wheel.
     
  5. HDDon

    HDDon Experienced Member Contributor Retired Moderators

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    Most machine shops and indy motorcycle shops will press the bearings in for a small charge. As a retired toolmaker I have put the bearings in the freezer for a few hours and most of the time they drop in. You can make a tool to press the bearings in by taking two 3X3X3/8 inch plates of aluminum and drill a 7/16 inch hole in the center of each. You will need a piece of 3/8 inch all thread, 2 nuts, two flat washers. Once the bearings are started in square use the plates, all thread and nuts to pull the bearings in. If the bearings need to go beyond flush use the old bearing to push them in with the tool.
     
  6. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

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    Don has you covered here, easy to make
    I too have made pullers and pushers this way
    My dad the best mechanic I new told me to NEVER hit a bearing with a punch, I live by this
     
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  7. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

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    Don has you covered here, I have made pullers and pushers this way, freezing is also a good way including installing valve guides. Jeff and My dad the best mechanic I knew taught me to NEVER hit a bearing with a punch, tho many do for lack of having proper tools
    [​IMG]
     
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  8. D.Bradfield

    D.Bradfield Active Member Contributor

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    Striking a bearing will cause brinelling.

    A common cause of brinelling is the use of improper installation procedures. Brinelling often occurs when pressing bearings into holes or onto shafts. Care must usually be taken to ensure that pressure is applied to the proper bearing race to avoid transferring the pressure from one race to the other through the balls or rollers. If pressing force is applied to the wrong race, brinelling can occur to either or both of the races. The act of pressing or clamping can also leave brinell marks, especially if the vise or press has serrated jaws or roughened surfaces. Flat pressing plates are often used in the pressing of bearings, while soft copper, brass, or aluminum jaw covers are often used in vises to help avoid brinell marks from being forced into the workpiece.[2]
     
  9. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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    Ah. OK. Missed that point.

    If you are doing both front and rear, check the Service Manual to make sure that you do not have to start on one side or the other wrt installing the bearings particularly on the rear. On my bike, they were very clear that I had to install one side first, and build up from there.

    Cheers,

    TQ
     
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  10. coopernicus

    coopernicus Junior Member Contributor

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    Yes, that is what my service manual says also. Thanks everyone for the advice and links.