What's this worth?

Discussion in 'Dyna Models' started by retgi, Sep 3, 2011.

  1. retgi

    retgi Member

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    I'm trying to sell a 79' corvette and mentioned in my ad that I'd consider a Harley or Jeep as part trade. I currently have a 10' Street Glide and have had numerous other bikes in the past but I'm just not sure what this guys bike is really worth. I suspect it's value is somewhere in the 8K - 10K range yet he's saying it's worth 15K since I'm asking 14K for my vette. Here's what he says:

    1992 Daytona Dyna Limited Edition # 109 of 1700 made. Rare valuable Harley and will only get more valuable with time. This is not a small little Sportster this is a big 1400 Dyna Glide. Its a Fat Boy without all the bulky add-ons. I wanted the stream lined chopper look while keeping the rare original option if you ever wanted to put back. There are less then 1500 of these left in the country.

    Bike has been upgraded with custom flame painted tank and fenders. The extra tank and fenders are worth over $2,000 alone.
    Custom Paint, Wild Bars, V&H Pipes, Lowered 2" and Screaming Eagle upgrade with large Cam and Mikuni carb. (FAST) Bike has tons of chrome on it.
    All anniversary parts also come with the bike as well. I have them shrink wrapped to stay mint. Anniversary Tank, Fenders and Seat.
    Worth around $15,000 with all these mods. This is quite possibly in the top 3 nicest Daytona's in the country very nice show quality.
     
  2. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    Obviously it's only worth what you are willing to pay for it but everyone thinks what they are selling is worth a lot more than the actual worth.

    KBB has it listed for $8, 065 Suggested retail which is only a guide of the resale price based on sales of the like bike.

    It would depend on how much you want that particular bike as to how much over the actual worth you are willing to pay.

    If the bike is ridden as opposed to no miles or modified the price as a collectable just isn't there. About the price appreciating??? I don't think that's really true based on actual figures of bikes sold.

    I wouldn't pay anything near $15K for the bike myself. JMHO

    As an example of bikes appreciating in price, In 2003 I bought a 2003 SE Deuce that went for $27K+ and invested another $6K into it totaling a bit over $33k figuring it would be a good investment and I would get a good resale price for it when I sold it. I kept it for 4 years and sold it after advertising it for almost 2 years for sale and getting ridiculously low offers. The final selling price was less than half of what was invested in the bike and that was an anniversary year as well as the Screamin' Eagle model with extras to the tune of $6K.
    So much for these tractors appreciating as time goes on. The only one that makes more on the bike than it's true value is the original selling dealer. After that its all downhill.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. retgi

    retgi Member

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    Thanks for your input. I also checked around and saw a few of these advertised around the country to get a better feel for it. I would never pay anything near what he is asking. I have a 79 corvette I'm willing to do a little trading on if the right bike comes along and I told him I could maybe do a trade plus his $4k but otherwise I wasn't interested.
     
  4. Breeze3at

    Breeze3at Well-Known Member

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    Let him keep his Daytona. You will probably never live long enough to see it's value hit $15,000. It was a limited edition, but was never popular. The very popular 1991 Dyna "Sturgis" model sells for less than $15.
     
  5. The Tourist

    The Tourist Banned

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    I heartily agree. And I'm in the same boat.

    I have my Dyna, Black Betty, built exactly as I want her. But it also creates a dilemma. To get exactly the bike you want, you spend money on parts, labor or both. Once achieved, most of that money is gone forever. Most guys don't think of their bikes as investments, more often just "really nice toys."

    So you have to make a choice from day-one. Ride a stock bike that might be a compromise to limit your loss later on, or build the bike you want, enjoy it, and take a future hit.

    I decided to keep my Dyna, and perhaps just get her converted to a trike in the future. I'll enjoy the bike now, adding a Sportster.

    However, it does create an interesting condition. Technically, in becoming a Harley customer now I have decided to not become a customer later. I often wonder if Harley knows that many of their clients who ride in every day for parts and free coffee might never be a client again.
     
  6. Hoople

    Hoople Account Removed

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    I would not do business with him just based on his attitude and the way he describes how Great his bike is.

    Rare valuable Harley,,,keeping the rare original option,,,this is not a small little Sportster,,,This is quite possibly in the top 3 nicest Daytona's in the country

    Then keep the thing yourself.
     
  7. Zephead

    Zephead Member

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  8. The Tourist

    The Tourist Banned

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    It's a pet peeve of mine. Some bikers believe the hype.

    My big bike has selective CVO parts on it, the ones that make the bike better--for me. Usually that means a better suspension.

    However, MoCo has this love/hate relationship with the bad boy image. Openly they deride real bike clubs. Then they make HOG patches that look like real club emblems from across the parking lot, and "instant choppers," clothes that look like the floor of my closet in 1968, with every wannabee idiot sporting new ink trumpeting, "Born To Invest In Real Estate."

    How many 'bad boys' do you think there really would be if folks had to cut and weld their own bikes? Heck, there isn't even a place to recycle oil in my little bedroom burg. Sometimes a broken scooter goes back to the shop on a trailor because of a computer error. Can you say "magneto"?

    So this guy mentioned here has rare bike with lots of doo-dads. He's been told to think it's good. But consider this, in 1968 all bikes were 'rare.' Each one was a sole representation, never duplicated and never seen again. I'm not sure how you advertise that in a brochure.
     
  9. retgi

    retgi Member

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  10. Hoople

    Hoople Account Removed

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    Excellent point.