Trailering Procedures

Discussion in 'General Harley Davidson Topic' started by hdcw3r, Feb 6, 2009.

  1. hdcw3r

    hdcw3r Member

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    Getting ready to trailer to some events, looking for proper/best tie down points for my DYNA. Got experience?

    I plan to build a sub-frame to install in the bed of my trailer with a front wheel capture channel and two arms to the sides extending just outside the handlebar width, but am not sure if putting straps on the handlebars versus very short straps at the bottom of the frame would be best, or maybe both. And does one normally strap down the tail as well?

    Thanks in advance folks, I have always walked away from this forum a little smarter!
     
  2. threesteps

    threesteps Junior Member

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    the handle bars/triple tree should be fine, but don't compress the struts too much. Should be able to tie off the frame in the rear. Again, good and snug but don't compress the shocks too much. Check the tie downs after a few miles to see they are secure and recheck at every gas stop etc.
     
  3. UglyJohn

    UglyJohn Active Member

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    Just one more thing to add that many don't think about until they do it and then cry..... If it's an open trailer..... "Do Not Cover The Bike" No matter what the weather is. The moving of the cover in the wind will sandpaper the paint right off! Just my .02. Something I found out many years ago and no you can't ask how I know. :D
    Ugly John
     
  4. rn0229

    rn0229 Member

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    I put a stack of 2X4's (3 I think, nailed together) under the frame and then pull down until everything is tight.
     
  5. buddybr

    buddybr Active Member

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    Below are the procedures in my Kendon Trailer Manual.

    Motorcycle(s) should be properly secured to the trailer with locking ratchet tie -down straps. Motorcycle(s) being transported must have at least four tie-down locations as to triangulate the system to ensure stability during transportation.

    a. Front Tie-Down Procedure. In the tree or fork area of your bike attach
    two ratchet tie-downs to the most forward tie-down area on the trailer
    (outrigger). Tighten the ratchet tie-downs so that the front suspension of
    the motorcycle is compressed to at least 75% of total travel. This is critical
    to ensuring the motorcycle remains stable on the trailer. The
    Compression of the front suspension of your motorcycle should result
    in very little additional compression being possible. As the trailer is
    towed, the motorcycle should not further compress its suspension on
    account of its own weight. Otherwise, Tie-Down hooks could become
    disengaged, resulting in the motorcycle becoming unattached.

    b. Rear Tie-Down Procedure. From a frame attachment point on the
    motorcycle (e.g., the rear swing-arm or suspension area) attach two tiedowns
    forward to mid-tie-down area (forward of the trailer axle location).
    These locations provide the stabilization and triangulation needed to
    secure the bike. The critical factor in securing the rear section of the
    motorcycle to the trailer is that the rear tire on the motorcycle locks the
    rear section of the trailer in place. This results because the rear motorcycle
    tire is pressing down on the rear folding section of the trailer, but
    the tie-down straps are secured to the trailer IN FRONT of the trailer axle.
     
  6. hdcw3r

    hdcw3r Member

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    Thanks fellas, but two more questions:

    1. Place tranny in gear or nuetral?

    2. Bike standing on tires or down on jiffy/kick stand?

    I like m0229's blocking suggestion but I dare not ask UglyJohn howeth he hath such great knowledge!!
     
  7. buddybr

    buddybr Active Member

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    1. If the bike is tied down correctly, in gear or not doesn't matter.

    2. The bike should be standing on the tires.
     
  8. Riviera Reg

    Riviera Reg Member

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    I prefer to tie the back of the bike down too, just enough to prevent the rear end from moving horizontally on the trailer, as this will also keep the bike standing up straight (vertically) providing even tension on the front straps. Most freeways / highways have a slight grade (crown) to the right for drainage and the rear end will try to move towards the grade.

    Also, if possible try to use ratchet tie down straps rather than cam buckle straps as there is less chance of them becoming loose. Recently purchased a set of Powertye soft straps on line any they work great. try PowerTye American Made Tie-Downs,Motorcycle Tie downs,Big Daddy, Soft tie,Ratchet Tie Downs
     
  9. little_earl

    little_earl Active Member

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    I heard to not use the kick stand. I forgot why but I think the bouncing would damage it.
     
  10. hdcw3r

    hdcw3r Member

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    Thanks again men.
    Hey TOP, (yeah you smitty) were you ever a MANCHU? I was for one year a non-infantry 1/9 MANCHU 84-85, Cp Greaves ROK. Keep Up the Fire....dude!