tools for the job

Discussion in 'Sportster Models' started by bubbu, Apr 5, 2014.

  1. bubbu

    bubbu Member

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    I was wondering what tools I would need to do all the maintenance on my 1987 1100 sporty. I finally retired and I'm going to keep busy next winter puttering around. I have alot of tools but not strictly for bikes, I know I need a set of torx wrenches, but a recommendation of sizes I would use or maybe a complete set would be helpful. I have all sorts of SAE and metric sets of tools but I assume that most of the work on the bike would be with torx wrenches. Any feedback would help, thanks. Ride Safe
     
  2. fin_676

    fin_676 Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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    It has been a wee while since I last worked on an 87 sportster but I do not remember there being any torx fasteners on it my sportster is a 93 and I do not think it has any torx fasteners
    I am pretty sure torx was introduced to the Harley line up in 95 and 96 however I could be wrong here
    On your bike you may have some replacement fasteners that are torx but it is always good to add new tools to the tool box so having a full set of torx bits is always a good idea ensure that any kit you buy has a t27 as it is used a lot by Harley and many sets of torx bits do not include it
    A good set of allen keys/bits is essential for your bike you will also find that some fasteners are metric but most are sae

    Brian
     
  3. bubbu

    bubbu Member

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    I believe your right about the torx on a 1987. The tools I have are allen wrenches at 90 degree. I am going to assume that these bolts are going to be rather stubborn to get off, what is the best tools to get so I can generate enough tork to loosen them without stripping the heads? Thanks
     
  4. fin_676

    fin_676 Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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    I have allen head bits to fit 3/8" square drive I use a 1/2" - 3/8" adapter to use my 1/2" square drive hand impact driver
    A couple of good smacks with a 3lb hammer on the impact driver usually gets the fastener moving
    On reassembly use some anti seize on the threads and torque to the correct pressure and it should stretch the fastener sufficiently to lock it in place and the anti seize prevents corrosion between the inner and outer threads and the fastener becoming seized
    If a hand impact driver does not move the fastener the next step would be to heat it I use a gas torch heating the fastener causes the metal to expand and hopefully break the corrosion bond once hot again try the impact driver if it fails to move it wait till it cools and contracts and try again often persistence of some heating and cooling cycles with some penetrating fluid given time to work will overcome most stuck fasteners

    Brian
     
  5. bubbu

    bubbu Member

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    Thanks for the info, it's not like I'm going to do a complete re-build anyway. Just all the work I'm comfortable with. Thanks again
     
  6. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

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    A pipe or an extension with a socket over the end of an allen wrench will give you more leverage
     
  7. wfmacii

    wfmacii Member

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    Other than the basic hex and or torx sockets a good torque wrench is essential. I have three to cover the full spectrum of inch and foot pound requirements for Harleys. For basic service a you will need a foot pound and inch pound torque wrench. I would look at the range of torque values in your owners manual for the type of service you would typically due and buy a torque wrench that fills most of those needs. If you watch amazon you can buy a CDI torque wrench for around $100. I understand CDI makes snap-on torque wrenches. I have been using them for quite a while. For brakes you may need 12 pt sockets. For my Heritage I need a 1/4 and 1/2 inch 12 point socket. Another of my favorite tools is a vacuum pump. I use it for flushing and bleeding the brake fluid. Most of the other tools I typically use are a quality combination wrench set, 6 point socket sets and screwdrivers.

    Hope this short list is helpful.
     
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  8. bubbu

    bubbu Member

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    All info is helpful, thanks. I think that about covers it. I only need to buy some 3/8 Hex head sockets, have the rest. Thanks