Too good to be true????

Discussion in 'General Harley Davidson Topic' started by Roman About, Apr 6, 2009.

  1. Roman About

    Roman About Member

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    I'm in the market to purchase another H-D. I will be buying something used this time and would like some input about a website I came across on my bike search.

    While searching, I came across a 2006 Night Train listed for $6,500. The listing stated the bike was a bank repo and was in "mint condition". Being cautiously optimistic, I checked out the seller's website which was called "therepocenter.net". The site contained other H-D bikes that were repos and were listed well under book value. The site even stated it would ship the bike to you.

    As I perused the site, I noticed that it appeared to be set-up by either a 6 year old child or someone who does not speak English very well because of the plethora of easily misspelled words and poor grammar. The more I looked at the site, the more I became convinced that it was bogus (even though I have no proof of it).

    I tried to do a little detective work on the Internet about the legitimacy of this website and business, but was unable to find anything much about it. I saw some people post comments on craigslist about the very same thing.

    Does anybody know anything about this place? It supposedly has an impound yard in Pensacola, FL.
     
  2. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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    You are gonna want to look, touch, listen and feel whatever bike you end up buying. Might want to look closer to home.

    TQ
     
  3. Roman About

    Roman About Member

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    I agree with you that it is important to do a physical inspection of anything before purchasing. I guess the bargin hunter in me wanted to check it out just for grins.
     
  4. flstcdorr

    flstcdorr Member

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    Yep...:bigsmiley31:Certainly looks like a scam to me. They won't be getting any business from me.
     
  5. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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    I was just giving you a word of caution. I don't know your personal situation. If you have mechanical skill and could carefully evaluate the condition of the alternatives it might be a good deal. I also do not know if you are buying these bikes "as is" with no warranty or guarantee on the purchase. Check out the VIN carefully to see if you can find the history of the bike before pulling the trigger.

    I would not hesitate to buy a bike I found this way once I evaluated it myself. But I do all my own work EXCEPT what requires expensive specialized tools or equipment (jugs, valve job, tranny dissassembly/assy, etc.). So take stock of the situation carefully. Evaluate your capabilities and the risks involved in buying a bike in this situation. Finally, check out the bikes' history as best you can.

    TQ
     
  6. The4opps1

    The4opps1 Junior Member

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    Keep in mind one thing my Dad always used to say to me:" If it sounds too good to be true....it probably is"...
     
  7. chefron

    chefron Active Member

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    Sound advice. From what I gather, there are a few of these sites popping up lately. A guy I work with was looking to buy a Silverado from one of these sites. When he did a little research, he found this same truck on 3 different sites, and all three had the truck in different states. Do your homework and don't commit any money.
     
  8. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    As mentioned above, "if it sounds too good to be true....." applies here.

    I have been exposed to a few of these scammers that contacted me in regards to something I was selling.

    It all starts off with an email with poor spelling and grammar which is the first tip off. They look like a third grade student wrote the email. I have played with them many times and had some fun but the final outcome is when they ask for your full name, telephone number and address to send the "certified" check to that is printed by them on an account that doesn't exist. The kicker is when they over pay for the item you are selling by a substantial amount and tell you to forward the difference once you cash the check to their shipper via western union.
    By the time the check is returned from the out of state bank as "no funds available", some have already sent the "shipping fees" on to the address given for the "shipper". That money is gone forever and you get the rubber check back from your bank .

    Buy locally and from someone that you feel you can trust after inspecting the merchandise.
     
  9. Steve Di.

    Steve Di. Active Member

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    I too experienced these people when selling a boat. I also played along and was told they would send me a bank check for more than my selling price and I was to send them their "change" in the form of a bank check. I received what looked like a real Bank Of America cashier's check. I called B.O.A.'s security/fraud department and was told that some of their check stock and check imprinters were stolen and that the check was bogus. Had I fallen for this, I would have been scammed out of $3,000.

    More recently, these sites and emails have been investigated on different news programs and have been traced to Nigeria. They play on our emotions and, in some cases, greed.
     
  10. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    The best way if you get one of these checks is to call the bank it's drawn on and verify that the funds are there to cover the check. They can't give you specifics but can tell if the funds are there to cover the check.
    Did it and found there was no account by the number on the check.