Suspected Exhaust Leak

Discussion in 'Touring Models' started by ultraj, Sep 8, 2010.

  1. ultraj

    ultraj Member

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    Has anyone gone through this problem? I have a 2001 ultra classic and it sounds like there is an exhaust leak somewhere. HD says it could be the crossover tube or the intake seals behind the throttle body. When at an idle and with just a little increase of throttle it has a whistle which goes away with RPM's. Does this sound like anyone has run into?
    Thanks,
    Ultraj
     
  2. Iceman24

    Iceman24 Well-Known Member

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    ultraj; see if you can pinpoint any leaks - look for black soot, or feel for air leaks (carefully). I've used "canned smoke" to locate air leaks (normally for smoke detector tests) which is safer than matches (fuel + flame = boom). Mostly concentrate at exhaust joints, clamps & connections b/c this is your most likely fail points. Good luck!
     
  3. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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    Like the Iceman wrote above, except for a possible crack at that weak spot on the Y of the rear pipe. It will be under the heat shield. Mine was about 1 1/4" long and about 1/16" across!! I was surprised to see that. New pipe I think was around $160 or so.

    TQ
     
  4. ultraj

    ultraj Member

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    Thanks for your help, I will check that out when I get out of work.

    I checked out the exhaust "Y" pipe and it had two cracks in it, replaced it and found out that the intake seals could also cause the same noise. I had the intake seals replaced and I still have the whistling noise when I first take off, am still checking for possible causes.
    Thanks for your help.:worthy
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 21, 2010
  5. maine-e-axe

    maine-e-axe Junior Member

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    Head gasket will make a whistle too.
     
  6. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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    Try getting some heavy gloves or some old towels and fold them up to use to block the exhaust pipes. Listen for a source of another exhaust leak. Helps to have a helper.

    TQ
     
  7. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

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    Welding gloves and a thick piece of card board, cover one pipe at a time and listen for sound to change:s