Surprise uneven RR tracks

Discussion in 'General Harley Davidson Topic' started by SportyHawg, Nov 15, 2008.

  1. SportyHawg

    SportyHawg Active Member

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    Okay, you know the tracks are ahead, and slow down -- but once you see them, you are going a little too fast for how UNEVEN they are.

    The mid-controls let you stand up so that your hind-end doesn't take the pounding. Don't those forward controls make you take it where you don't want it?

    Just wondering...
     
  2. Sharky1948

    Sharky1948 Junior Member

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    In the MSF course, I was taught to lift my butt a bit by standing when hitting something like a RR track. And, approach the object at 90* of course. On my old Sporty which had forward controls I could get out of the seat by using a bit of upper body and using the grips for leverage. It worked at slow speeds as well as highway speeds. I only lifted my butt enough to take the pressure off.

    (Now I just sit on my comfy Mustang seat on my RK and cruise on through...)
     
  3. krikket

    krikket Active Member

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    My Night Train has forward controls and I can (and have) stand up on the pegs while riding. It's not as easy as a bike with mid controls.
     
  4. USMCCWO5

    USMCCWO5 Junior Member

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    I was also taught to throttle to the obstacle, let off the gas, lift my weight off the seat, and coast over the obstacle. This is from the Advanced MSF course this year.
     
  5. NEWHD74FAN

    NEWHD74FAN Experienced Member Retired Moderators

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    That is exactly why I added Mid-Controls to handle rough roads and severe unplanned bumps (expansion joints on overpasses for example at highway speeds), especially when two-up on my forward control equipped Sporty. :ap

    In the past, if solo I would have used the passenger pegs...don't hesitate using any of the tools your bike provides for a given situation! As most of us have stated, practice constantly to improve your rider skills, especially after winter hibernation. The human mind is a great tool, but skills will wane if not used. :bigsmiley11:
     
  6. SportyHawg

    SportyHawg Active Member

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    Those are great ideas. I think I hit the top of my fork tubes with the amount of shock the front end of the bike took. I'm lucky I didn't go over the handlebars. Its a dangerous crossing, day or night with that much difference between pavement and rail.
     
  7. NEWHD74FAN

    NEWHD74FAN Experienced Member Retired Moderators

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    One other thing, if your suspension is bottoming out, you may want to adjust the preload 1 notch in the back and like Glider recommends by using slightly heavier fork oil (may want to change springs/preload based on your weight and amount of travel needed) if you find the front suspension bottoming out more often than it should (see the Maintenance section on Fork Oil Change & Suspension). Lots of good stuff in there! :s
     
  8. Romain

    Romain Active Member

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    We have very few RR tracks crossings in and around London but we have speed bumps all over the place and they can be very nasty. there are regulations as regards their heights but apparently most local authorities seem to ignore them and build them too high. On many of them, you can see the scars left by their contact with the underside of vehicles.
    I ride a Custom Sporty and I find that a very low speed (15-20mph) and a pull on the bar with the feet on the forward pegs is usually enough to save your spine.
    With 2ups, it often bottoms up, specially on the downside even at the top preset adjustment and I have occasionally had the underside of the bike make contact with the tarmac, Ouch!
     
  9. pookibr

    pookibr Active Member

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    I was taught the same thing. Raise your butt and let off the throttle and 90*
     
  10. 01dynaglide

    01dynaglide Junior Member

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    I have forward controls on my dyna. You can lift up with no problem.