Sportster Oil Cooler / Thermostat Mis-Match?

Discussion in 'Sportster Models' started by M0sesJJN, Dec 3, 2008.

  1. M0sesJJN

    M0sesJJN Member

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    Technical Question:

    I have a 2008 Sportster 1200L w/oil cooler HD P/N 62996-07 installed by the dealer.

    Used to be the standard in line thermostat was the Lockhart DP-180 which is no longer being made. I can only find one in the Netherlands, (Jan Willem Boon - Obsolete New Old Stock parts for your Harley-Davidson motorcycle and American made replacement parts * Obsolete Harley Parts Distributor) and they won't ship to USA.

    I do have on hand an in line thermostat HD P/N 62824-97 which HD says fits the FL series bikes 1997 and up.

    Is there any known reason not to install this thermostat on my XL? I assume they all open at the same temp (180 degrees F) and that this one would flow more gallons per minute than the old DP-180 and thus be safe.

    If intalled properly I seriously doubt it would cause my engine any harm; but just in case any engineer/mechanic types know of any reason it might?

    Does anyone also know where I can get installation instructions? I don't see any flow arrows on it.

    Thanks,

    Moe.
     
  2. M0sesJJN

    M0sesJJN Member

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    PS got the instructions.

    Decided to put thermostat on anyway...and watch oil temp, pressure, level for first few miles.

    Anybody know hows comes dey don't manufacture in line oil cooler thermostats no more?

    Wazzup w/dat?

    Moe.
     
  3. NEWHD74FAN

    NEWHD74FAN Experienced Member Retired Moderators

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    Just different reasons -- for some, coolers utilize thermostat to allow bike to get up to temperature faster, others feel that it is an auxilliary cooler and only for supplementing existing cooling available (parallel) in case it fails, no harm no foul. The other reason probably is cost...as most riders who install an oil cooler are probably running their Harleys hard and long enough to not require it's added complexity or cost, (looking at proportion of the overall oil cooler cost verses added thermostatic valve, fittings, clamps, packaging & logistical details). :s

    If you are worried about over-cooling or over-heating you can buy an analog oil temperature guage/dipstick/oil filler cap for $40 and monitor temperature. Cheap insurance and it is easier to install & remove, than the old cap (at least on my Sporty). :D
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2008
  4. M0sesJJN

    M0sesJJN Member

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    Hey...didn't mean to post twice, but it kicked me out, said I wasn't logged in...then said I gotta wait 30 seconds to post...so I did...came up twice. Weird.

    Yep, I got me one of them thermometer oil caps...takes about 20 minutes for it to reach 180 degrees when the weather is 60 F. (Of course it's testing the temp of the oil tank, not the engine.) In my old age I quit riding when it gets 40 F or less. Hit a patch of black ice on a bike at hiway speeds, and I guarantee it's an experience you ain't NEVER gonna forget...

    I've had three bikes, installed oil cooler on all of them, but all had thermostats. The backs ran just a little bit smoother, stronger, and I could boogey up really steep hills in 4th that used to require shifting down to 3rd. My 94 XLH definitely has overcooling problems on cold days, so I installed a in-line stat.

    My '87 Heritage ST Classic would begin to knock like a dog and feel draggy on the smallest hill IF it was 90 F or more AND I had a passenger. Got LockHart cooler and problem solved.

    Which raises the question of what direction does the oil flow anyway? I gotta 2008 XL 1200 Low. Read somewhere that Harley routed it so the cool oil goes through the filter then to the engine, then hot oil to the tank. Seems hot oil should go to the filter because it would be less strain on the filter, less blockage. And cool oil should go to the tank, so as not to cook the rider. (Could be a plus in Northern climes...) I noticed yesterday Jagg's coolers have a coupler that re-routes the oil flow.

    As for over cooling - back in the day, when I lived in Vermont, every now and again someone would blow up their car 'cause it was a wicked cold and they would try to warm up it up by standing on the gas red-lining the engine for several minutes (NEVER DO THIS!) while it was in nuetral or park. The cold, thick oil couldn't push through the filter easily, so it'd tear up the paper elements and more and gobs of crap would scamper merrily through the engine gleefully raping and pillaging any bearing surfaces in their path and KABLLOOOEEEYYY!

    Then the goober would get a lawyer and sue Ford/GM/Jeep/Whomever for selling them a lemon...

    I got the stat for them spring/fall days 'cause I stated thinking about when it's not so cold then you hang out at our girlfriend's late and then suddenly realize you gotta long drive ahead of you in 40 F degree or lower weather...gotta wonder if the oil's hot enough to do it's job...although with all the overheating problems you read on the forum for the new bikes who knows?

    Anyway, if it seems to overcool on colder days I'll slap the stat on there. Better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it. And since they don't make em anymore, it could become a collector's item! (Guess I shouldn't have opened the original packaging...)

    Moe.

    :VERMONT
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 9, 2008
  5. M0sesJJN

    M0sesJJN Member

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    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2008
  6. NEWHD74FAN

    NEWHD74FAN Experienced Member Retired Moderators

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    During the winter, many who do not have a thermostat just block the oil cooler with a cover, no wrenching required and you could make a fancy one using virtually any type of material, billet, metal & chrome. Just a thought...:s
     
  7. Ken S.

    Ken S. Active Member

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    Hobbit is in England. (sorry if I don't have you in the right spot Hobbit) He could maybe order it for you and ship it here.:ap