Spoke wheels vs Mag Wheels

Discussion in 'Softail Models' started by harleyed, Feb 14, 2009.

  1. harleyed

    harleyed Member

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    I am wanting to put chrome mag wheels on my Softtail.I need some input on how these wheels will ride vs the spoke wheels that are on the bike.I am looking at RC wheels.Any other suggestions?
     
  2. dangerdan

    dangerdan Junior Member

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    I would think there is no difference in handling.
    I prefer chrome spoke as I like the look , but they are a real pain to clean.
     
  3. walleye

    walleye Junior Member Contributor

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    I too like the look of spokes, but with the pain to keep clean along with the fact that if you get a flat your screwed, makes me like the mags better. With a mag you can repair on the road to get to a tire shop. With spokes you need a trailer. Just my thought on the subject. :52:
     
  4. NEWHD74FAN

    NEWHD74FAN Experienced Member Retired Moderators

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    Walleye, your logic is sound regarding on the road repairs. Manufacturers moved to cast wheels to migrate fully to tubeless tires due to their long safety record and development cycles on the street and the track. Much less air loss over time (lower maintenance), and less heating due to internal rubbing of a tube within the protective tire skin, allowing softer compounds to be used.

    Although tubeless tires are harder to mount, the drop-in center rim bead design makes machine mounting possible, at the same time allows good sealing once both tire beads "seat" sealing postively (special soft pliable rubber compound conforms to rim defects well). Cast wheel and tire assemblies are less likely to have catastrophic failures with "explosive rapid air pressure loss" like a spoked wheel with tubed tire. This is due to the "self healing" nature of the tubeless tire inner soft rubber lining.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2009
  5. crshoveride1

    crshoveride1 Member

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    I currently have the original spokes on my bike as well. I love the look of the spokes as I'm trying to keep a "classy" look for the bike while still trying to make it my own. However, I've recently looked at some Mags I like and I think it would make a very dramatic difference in my bike and I'll still have the classy look I want. I've got Mags on my Wide Glide and I don't notice any difference in handling. Only difference is the amount of heads snapping when going by my bikes. Basically I think it'll come down to what YOU like as far as the look of your bike and whether or not you want to spend the money on Custom Rims. Good luck in deciding!:bigsmiley12:
     
  6. walleye

    walleye Junior Member Contributor

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    Hobbit,
    If I understand your post correctly, you are saying you can use a plug on spoked tires? I am under the impression this is impossible as the air will leak out of the spoke's. I also understood this is why a spoke tire goes flat almost instantly. I know there were some companies using a inside coating with some success to "seal" up the spoked rims but I was told there is limited success. Let me know if I am off base. Thanks.
     
  7. walleye

    walleye Junior Member Contributor

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    Well I learned something new...again! Thanks guys.:D
     
  8. Eddy1

    Eddy1 Member

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    Hobbit do you happen to know who makes this sealant & where you can get it?
     
  9. dangerdan

    dangerdan Junior Member

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    There was a discussion last year about adding goop in your tires. If you had a flat tire and had to take your tire in to be replaced, most shops would not work on it because of the mess.
    So be prepared to remove that tire on your own and clean that rim.
     
  10. NEWHD74FAN

    NEWHD74FAN Experienced Member Retired Moderators

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    There is a trick used in "Simulated" Spoke Wheels...the drop center rim has a layer of epoxy that seals the wheel, combining the "Classic" look of spokes, only no inner tube or rim "tape" is required. Another design developed in the 70's to maintain the classic looks of British cars in modern times like the Aston Martin, Jaguar and others...:p