roller chain conversion

Discussion in 'Engine, Fuel and Exhaust' started by Dswartz, Jan 2, 2012.

  1. Dswartz

    Dswartz Active Member

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    Tomorrow I am finally going to start on the roller chain conversion for my bike. I have done alot of reading on this site and have a pretty good idea of how to do it. One question I have is what is a good type of assembly lube to use and where exactly do I apply it? everything?

    I am also concerned about oil pressure during initial startup. I know some guys turn the engine over with the plugs out to build pressure. I've read that you need to ground the wires while doing this. To ground the wires do you insert the plug into the wire and have that touching the motor? or do you have to ground it some other way?

    I'm sure I will have a few more questions over the next couple of days but i'm really looking forward to the project.
     
  2. kemo

    kemo R.I.P

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    I would not worry about the brand of assembly lube, use lots of it on everything. You will get oil pressure when you turn the engine over when you are aligning the oil pump, you do not have to ground the plug wires, your ignition is turned off.
    Ken
     
  3. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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    When I did mine, I rolled it over with the plugs out using the rear wheel with the tranny in a high gear (like 4th or 5th). This let me listen for any "unnatural noises". After that, I hooked up the battery and rolled it some more with the starter until I had a bit of oil pressure on the gauge, again listening for noise. Finally, I reinstalled the plugs and fired it up. Oil pressure was right there almost immediately.

    If you have not done so, check this out:

    TQ's Engine Build

    Harley Davidson Community

    TQ
     
  4. 2000classic

    2000classic Active Member

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    To answer one of your questions, yes you may set a code if you do not ground the plugs. I have a different solution than most for when I need to turn over the engine for diagnostic reasons. You can make a remote start switch on the cheap here which does not require the ignition to be turned on. Using any kind of on/off switch and two long wires. To the end of one wire add a female spade terminal to match the terminal where the green wire is located on top of the starter. On the other wire add a small jumper cable type clamp. This will be attached to the main battery cable on top of the starter. Now simply flip the switch to turn over the engine as needed. I do remove the plugs also.:)
     
  5. Dswartz

    Dswartz Active Member

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    Sir,

    I have definately checked out your engine build and you did an outstanding job. I guess my question is really how do I properly ground the wires while turning the engine over with the starter to avoid damage to the coil and setting a code? I know that I turn it over by hand while I'm aligning the pump but after I have it all together I thought it would be a good idea to turn it over a few times with the starter as well. I assumed that I could insert the plugs into the wires and have the plug contact the head, then turn the motor over with the starter. Is this correct? Also should I do this with the top rocker box covers off to see if I can observe oil getting to the top rockers? I am going the cheap route and taking the push rods out of the top so I will have the covers off anyway. I guess I am just paranoid about the new oil pump and want to make sure it's doing its job before I start the bike.
     
  6. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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    I just jammed the wires in between the fins, but as indicated above, you can use 2000Classic's suggestion to jumper the starter, and then you are not powering up the ECU, coils or anything else. But you will not have an electric oil pressure gauge either. But if you are only looking for flow at the top end, that may not matter.

    When I did mine, I had no problems or codes set, and I just turned on the switches and mashed START.

    TQ
     
  7. Dswartz

    Dswartz Active Member

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    I didn't plan to start on the project until today but last night after dinner I got too excited and couldn't wait to start spinning wrenches. The tear down was much easier than I thought. I got everything taken apart in a little more than two hours and that's with taking the push rods out the top.

    Today I'm planning to take the support plate to a local indy mechanic and have him press the cams from the old plate to the new one. I just hope the reassembly goes as smooth as the disassembly did. I've never had trouble taking things apart...it's getting it back together that worries me! I'll keep you guys posted...

    About the starter I think I'm just going to follow TQuentin's method and jam the wires into the fins. I like 2000 classics idea about rigging up a switch but to be honest I'm really not much of a wiring guy and am worried I would mess something up. I dont know what it is about electrical wiring but I'm really not very good with it. Just trying to keep things simple. Thanks for all the help so far everybody.

    I ran into a small roadblock today. I went to install the inner cam bearings. The first one I did seems to be working and turning just fine, but the other bearing seems frozen for some reason. I cant get the bearing needles to turn at all. I never checked the bearing before install but is this something that will loosen up or do you think I got a bad bearing? They arent very expensive so I might end up simply replacing it but wanted to get some thoughts on it before I did. I wonder if I somehow caused it while pressing it in. Any thoughts?
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 4, 2012
  8. kemo

    kemo R.I.P

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    I would replace, easy to do now. Did you use the tools to remove and replace the bearings or did you make do with some other method.
    Ken
     
  9. Dswartz

    Dswartz Active Member

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    I used the proper tools. Im just surprised that I cant turn the bearing. I've never seen that before. I wonder if I pushed it too hard but like I said I used the installer tool....strange. Oh well at least its a fairly cheap fix.
    [​IMG]
     
  10. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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    As Ken said, definitely replace it. I assume you are installing the Torringtons (Timken) bearings and putting them in so you can read the stamping, right? They just go in so they are flush which is all the install tool will push them.

    TQ