Reverse steering, turning hard on Triumph

Discussion in 'General OFF TOPIC' started by bikermonkey, May 5, 2008.

  1. bikermonkey

    bikermonkey Active Member

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    I ride with a friend who's poor taste lead them to purchasing an '02 Triumph America. On twisties and sliders she complained the bike is not responsive. So we traded bikes a few miles and I have never seen this issue in all my years of riding. In a curve in either direction, you can feel the forks push against you when reverse steering, it is very resistant and want's to upright. Leaning into a curve produces the same effect. It's like a top, always wants to upright and is very stern about it too. Forks are loose enough, no binds, tires about new. I suggested she may try changing the fork oil as they seemed a bit stiff but I doubt that will actually fix it. Forks have not been changed nor rake changed. Acts like the geometry is just off, but find it hard to believe it's just poor numbers. Any idea's ?:wall
     
  2. Hoon

    Hoon Active Member

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    Well, first of all, purchasing a Triumph is definitely not poor taste, purchasing a bike that is 6 years old and not knowing what may have happened to it could be. Triumph's are known for exemplary handling. With that said, Americas and Speedmasters do have considerable rake in the front end but, you should know that going in. If it is as severe as you say, I'd suggest you have a reputable dealer check it out. jmo
    btw..I've ridden both bikes many times and have not found that problem.
     
  3. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    One thing that you forgot to mention about Triumphs is their natural tendency to leak oil.:s
     
  4. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    Oh no, a leak, where is it leaking from? Is it blinker fluid?
     
  5. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    Rear one on the right side?
     
  6. Hoon

    Hoon Active Member

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    With the old Triumphs maybe, but not with the Hinkly (sp?) built bikes, at least none of mine. I have found that owners are usually responsible for more leaks than the manufactures were, you know, poor maintenance habits. jmo
     
  7. bikermonkey

    bikermonkey Active Member

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    Harleys don't leak. They mark their spot. :p
     
  8. bikermonkey

    bikermonkey Active Member

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    No, she had complained about it. I test rode the bike when she got it, had drag bars on it and the front end seemed very, very heavy to the point I deemed dangerous. I switched out her bars for the factory bars and went around the parking lot, much better but the front end still seemed heavy. I did not ride it in curves until she'd complained about it. Switched bikes and wow, it's a monster. You can lean or counter steer either direction and it fights to remain upright. Tires were about 10 lbs, that helped to air them up, but is no where near normal still. She's taking it to the dealer, I could not find a logical reason for the problem.
     
  9. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    Have you checked the front end swing with the bike off the ground to see if the steering head bearings are binding?
     
  10. bikermonkey

    bikermonkey Active Member

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    Sure did, put it on my lift. Head has no play, forks turn smooth with no binds, axle is fine with no wheel slop, spins freely. I said in previous post tires had 10lbs, meant they were 10lbs low, not just 10 in them. Tire is a bit worn but not bad and wron evenly in center. I swear it's like a top, it wants to toss you back upright with authority in a curve from either direction, never seen such a thing in all my days.:wall