Remove rust and plastic from Exhaust

Discussion in 'Other Service and Maintenance' started by Jack Klarich, Jun 12, 2016.

  1. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

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    Here is a video from you tube, I have just tried it and it does work
     
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  2. Bodeen

    Bodeen Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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    Neverdull is a great product for chrome, stainless steel, and aluminum. I always keep a can around.
     
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  3. gator508

    gator508 Senior Member

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    That is one nasty looking exhaust! Good post!
     
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  4. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

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    It took a bit of doing but I got ALL the plastic off, It had burned black @ the front of the muffler, the only bit of residue I could not get off was on the bolt threads of the clamp
     
  5. dbmg

    dbmg Experienced Member

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    I do not think that I would use a penny on the newer chrome today.
     
  6. coopernicus

    coopernicus Junior Member Contributor

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    Also aren't the newer pennies NOT all copper?
     
  7. Stevecracker

    Stevecracker Member

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    A penny is copper-plated mild steel.
     
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  8. Stevecracker

    Stevecracker Member

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    A penny made of copper would be worth a bit more than one cent!
     
  9. coopernicus

    coopernicus Junior Member Contributor

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    The Composition of the Cent

    Following is a brief chronology of the metal composition of the cent coin (penny):

    • The composition was pure copper from 1793 to 1837.
    • From 1837 to 1857, the cent was made of bronze (95 percent copper, and five percent tin and zinc).
    • From 1857, the cent was 88 percent copper and 12 percent nickel, giving the coin a whitish appearance.
    • The cent was again bronze (95 percent copper, and five percent tin and zinc) from 1864 to 1962.
      (Note: In 1943, the coin's composition was changed to zinc-coated steel. This change was only for the year 1943 and was due to the critical use of copper for the war effort. However, a limited number of copper pennies were minted that year. You can read more about the rare, collectible 1943 copper penny in "What's So Special about the 1943 Copper Penny.")
    • In 1962, the cent's tin content, which was quite small, was removed. That made the metal composition of the cent 95 percent copper and 5 percent zinc.
    • The alloy remained 95 percent copper and 5 percent zinc until 1982, when the composition was changed to 97.5 percent zinc and 2.5 percent copper (copper-plated zinc). Cents of both compositions appeared in that year.
     
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  10. coopernicus

    coopernicus Junior Member Contributor

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    Sorry I couldn't resist...got nothing better to do right now....lol