Question on loose compensator bolt

Discussion in 'Transmission' started by trvlr, Oct 23, 2010.

  1. trvlr

    trvlr Junior Member

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    Popped the cover on my primary today to get in and just check things out and found the compensator bolt not torqued to spec. Torque'd it down to 150 ft-lbs as that is all I can get from my Craftsman torque wrench.

    #1 - 150 ft-lbs is not quite to spec. Book calls for 155-165 ft-lbs. Buy another torque wrench or will 150ft-lb do the job?

    #2 - With the bolt not torqued to spec on checking - do I need to remove the bolt, clean the threads, red-loctite and then torque it back down, or will simply torqueing it back down to spec, as I did, be ok?

    #3 - To clean threads on bolts that have had loctite applied (blue or red) - what do you guys recommend? I've used acetone and a wire brush on other maint activities and never really did get the threads clean enough to where I thought a follow-up application of loctite was really as clean as it probably needed to be for optimum results ??

    :dknow

    #4 - The primary cover gasket - can you get more than 1 remove/reinstall out of the same gasket, or does each removal and re-install require a new gasket?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 23, 2010
  2. Hoople

    Hoople Account Removed

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    Since the compensator bolt is just 1 bolt, you probably could have torqued it to 150#, then scribe the hex and gave it another portion of a flat with a breaker bar. It is not like you are pulling a cover or cylinder head down and can easily warp something. It is hard to damage a single stud that thick and big. I would have just went to 150 then added a portion of a flat. If you used Red 271, you can't go back on top of the torque reading and add more. The working time on 271 is short.
     
  3. fin_676

    fin_676 Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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    If it were my compensator coming loose i would clean the threads and apply new loctite
    to clean the threads i would use a wire brush and some thinners then some soft cotton as a final wipe
    i do have a torque wrench that will go high enough but I'm not sure how accurate it is so i use the good one it goes to 150 and then give it just a wee bit more you will feel it move so far i haven't had any of mine come loose
    my biggest problem seems to be getting them to move in the first place

    Brian
     
  4. trvlr

    trvlr Junior Member

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    Thanks guys for the follow-up. This bike has always sounded a bit sloppy down in that primary area when working the bike from starts in 1st gear, and seemed to be getting more mechanical chatter over the last month or so. Read a few posts of loose compensator bolts so decided to check and found mine to be loose.

    Was thinking that with the bolt being loose, that it needed to be removed and cleaned up to do it correctly. Also like that extra tick on a flat to get that last bit of torque to get closer to spec. Think I'm gonna try to re-use that gasket on the primary cover as at some point gonna do that SE comp upgrade, just not ready for it yet and it was $35. I did get 3 remove/reinstall's on the derby cover gasket, but it's now starting to seep oil - so will keep an eye on how that gasket holds up. Thanks fellas.
     
  5. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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  6. trvlr

    trvlr Junior Member

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    TQ - I actually did read both those pdf's last night (which are actually the same bullentin), and couldn't tell for sure but looks to me like this applies to 2003-2005 models and post 05 this was part of HD's production process.

    Please correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't look like this service bullentin applies to my 08 EG? I've seen several comments linking this article re: comp torgue procedures, but looks to me is only for 03-05 and that post 05 this procedure is now part of the production line assembly process. Again, correct me if I'm wrong on this - thanks
     
  7. Blue Wide Glide

    Blue Wide Glide Junior Member

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    I have re-used the primary gasket several times without it leaking. Lay it between paper towels to dry it off while you are working. A dealer will replace it every time because if it leaks, it is on them. You have the chance to save $30, and if it leaks buy a new one.
     
  8. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

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    IMO, I would use 30 degrees after initial torque if re using original bolt, too many bolts today in critical areas are torque prevailing and IMO should be replaced, This is another reason we would replace studs and head bolts on Evo builds JMO, Capital Jack:s
     
  9. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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    Well, that was the date of the document. Let me check. Here is the procedure from the '08 Touring book:

    1. See Figure 6-10. Apply a thin layer of primary chaincase oil, to the inner diameter of the compensating sprocket 2008 Touring Service: Drive 6-5 (3). and the splines of shaft extension (4). Assemble shaft extension, compensating sprocket and sliding cam (2). Place primary chain over compensating sprocket
    assembly.
    2. Place drive components (primary chain, compensating sprocket assembly, and clutch assembly) into position. The clutch hub and shaft extension are splined, so a slight rotation of the chain drive will aid installation.
    3. If reusing bolt (6), remove threadlocking material from bolt and engine sprocket shaft. Clean and prime threads of bolt and sprocket shaft. Apply two drops of LOCTITE THREADLOCKER 262 (red) to the threads of bolt. Install bolt and washer (5) hand tight.

    NOTE
    Clutch hub mainshaft nut has left-hand threads.

    4. Clean and prime threads of nut. Apply two drops of LOCTITE THREADLOCKER 262 (red) to the threads of the clutch hub mainshaft nut. Start nut onto mainshaft and tighten hand tight.

    NOTE

    See Figure 6-11. When tightening the compensating sprocket bolt, the PRIMARY DRIVE LOCKING TOOL (Part No. HD-47977) must be placed between the teeth of the engine and clutch sprockets.

    5. Tighten compensating sprocket bolt to 155-165 ftlbs (210.1-223.7 Nm). Remove primary drive locking tool.

    NOTE
    See Figure 6-12. When tightening the clutch hub mainshaft nut the PRIMARY DRIVE LOCKING TOOL (Part No. HD-47977) must be placed between the teeth of the engine and clutch sprockets.

    6. Tighten clutch hub mainshaft nut to 70-80 ft-lbs (94.9-108.5 Nm). Remove primary drive locking tool.

    TQ
     

    Attached Files:

  10. trvlr

    trvlr Junior Member

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    Thanks all for the follow-up.

    Decided to remove/reinstall the compensator bolt this afternoon and do this the correct way so locked the sprockets, grabbed my breaker bar and cheater pipe

    [​IMG]

    and had "no problem" breaking this bolt loose and removing. Backed the bolt out and got this:

    [​IMG]


    So that would explain this bolt working itself loose and the ease in which it came out. I'm left wondering if it rolled off the assembly line like this, or if the prior owner had to either get into this area or had an HD shop work on something. I didn't even think to ask for the prior service history when I bought this bike, so that was a mistake on my part. Not sure if I can get a prior service history on this bike from my local HD service dept. Anyone know on that by chance?

    The loctite application looked clean and this bike is an 08 and had 8k mi on it when I bought it. So from what I'm seeing, I'm thinking it either rolled off the assy line like this, or maybe someone did have to get in there to work on something and perhaps used a new bolt when putting it back together. Don't know and will likely never find out. But to Jack's point, a new bolt does sound like the right thing to do due to the torque load this assy has to handle.

    And fwiw - couldn't find any of the loctite primer/cleaner checking the local shops, so soaked the bolt threads in acetone and scrubbed with a wire brush. Cleaned up pretty good, the bolt. The threads on the inner area of the shaft...short of chasing that with a tap, I don't know how you'd go about getting that cleaned up.

    And a tip of the hat to JDPEagle - his suggestion worked like a charm :worthy

    [​IMG]