Problem with Kickstarter 74 shovel

Discussion in 'Classic Models' started by rdean617, Sep 28, 2014.

  1. rdean617

    rdean617 Member

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    Thanks again for the info on the clutch adj., after going over a lot of items, I finally went to fire up the bike. The beast didn't want to and hasn't started. Some sand in the Vaseline occurred when the kick starter seized up. Brought it up to the compression stroke and won't allow me to kick it.
    I've never worked on one so any advice or ideas what I should be looking for would be appreciated. :worthy
     
  2. Breeze3at

    Breeze3at Well-Known Member

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    First make sure it is the kicker that is the problem. Remove the spark plugs, put the bike in gear and move it forward or backwards to insure the engine makes full revolutions past TDC. You could have a valve hanging or other problem.
     
  3. tourbox

    tourbox Senior Member

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    I would agree with Breeze3at. Make sure the motor will turn over. Did you bring it to compression stroke with the Kicker? Have you ever been able to kick it thru several times?
    tourbox
     
  4. rdean617

    rdean617 Member

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    :sd
    Yes, I was bringing it to the compression stroke and getting ready to kick it. Then it just stopped dead. I've tried to stroke it through, but with no luck.
    Tried to roll it through TDC, also with no luck.
     
  5. tourbox

    tourbox Senior Member

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    I went back and reread your post on the clutch adj. I believe you said it was a belt primary.
    If so is it an open primary? Either way pull the plugs out, pull in clutch lever(tie it to the grip if you don't have help. Now try to kick it thru, it should free spin the clutch inner hub but not turn the motor over. If it does this then you have motor or primary problem. this will only work if the clutch is adj. correctly. Next you could try to turn the motor over with a 1/2 drive ratchet & socket on the motor sprocket nut. With the clutch lever still tied off the motor should turn pretty easy, no clutch drag. Next big step is to pull the kicker cover back off for a look see
    tourbox
     
  6. rdean617

    rdean617 Member

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    You were correct, it's a belt but not open primary. Just so I understand correctly, leave the tranny in neutral while the clutch lever is pulled in. Try to kick it thru.
    While doing this or using the motor sprocket nut, how much force should I be applying? Am I just trying to see if the kicker frees up?
     
  7. tourbox

    tourbox Senior Member

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    Yes leave it in Neutral and clutch lever pulled in. If the clutch is adj. correctly it will release the outer shell( which has your primary belt to motor) from the inner hub( has the clutch plates). At this point you are only kicking over the released clutch and should kick over very easily by hand with the spark plugs out. I know you stated it was pretty much a basket case. If the engine & oil tank was in the frame with oil in the tank then it could also sumped the engine. That means the flywheel area is Full of oil thus making it extremely hard to kick over. There is no plug on the bottom to drain it out.
    tourbox
     
  8. tourbox

    tourbox Senior Member

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    As far as the sumping goes: remove the outer primary cover, it will be dry. No oil is used with Belt primary. Use a wrench, ratchet to turn the motor over in the correct rotation,counter clock wise. Put a pan under the engine vent hose. Turn the motor over by hand until the oil stops, slows to a drip, stops coming out the vent hose. If that was your problem then you should be able to kick it thru again.
    tourbox
     
  9. rdean617

    rdean617 Member

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    I tried both ways to turn the cylinders with no luck. So I went for the easiest repair mode, for me. That involved telling my friend who had done all the engine work (and was paid to do it) this was not the condition he had "promised" it would be in. So we agreed he would come over to take care of this and another small problem and all would be good.
    I can't thank you enough, for your advice, as I have a much better sense of what to look for during this repair. My stress level was slowly climbing and your timely responses had a lot to do keeping those levels under control. Thanks I will let know how it comes out along with a pic or 2 when it fires up.:cheers:cheers