primary chain stretch?

Discussion in 'Transmission' started by billst, Jul 26, 2009.

  1. billst

    billst Member

    52
    6
    0
    have a 95 flstn with primary auto adjust tensioner installed by the previous owner. i had a problem with chain slap so removed the outer case to check it out. i found small grooves cut into the case by the chain. there were already 3 shims under the tensioner so added 2 more to add more tension. this seems to have fixed the problem for now but what i'm wondering is. has the chain stretched so much that the adjuster cannot add enough tension? has the adjuster spring itself gotten too weak or is this setup not as good as the original tensioner? has anyone tried the new hydraulic auto tensioner? any thoughts are appreciated. thanks
     
  2. NEWHD74FAN

    NEWHD74FAN Experienced Member Retired Moderators

    8,176
    98
    16
    My first question is why use shims? If pad on the tensioner has grooves worn in it, and your chain stretched to require 3 shims (BTW, did not know this was standard practice on a 1995 Heritage, so I would be wary)...don't you think something should be changed out? IF it is the original chain and tensioner, I think you have gotten plenty of use out of it to change it...probably a good time to inspect the rest...i.e. clutch pack, bearings, seals etc. and do it right...JMHO.
     
  3. billst

    billst Member

    52
    6
    0
    thanks for the reply. the grooves were wore in the case not the pad. this was from the chain slapping . the pad is actually pretty near perfect.this type of auto adjuster comes with shims for this purpose. just wasn't sure how much to ad. i'm thinking time to change the chain also. i am just about to hit 160,000 kl on this m/c
     
  4. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

    4,630
    68
    99
    My guess is you have the Hayden M6 tensioner (Hayden Enterprise ----). I have one of those on both my bikes and like them. You use enough shims to get 5/8" between the top of the lower plate or top shim and the bottom of the shoe. Make sure the shoe travels vertically with no binding.

    With a '95, your chain may have reach the end of it's useful life. New ones are about $50, but you might get a good deal at Zanotti's or Biker Bob's.

    TQ
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2009
  5. billst

    billst Member

    52
    6
    0
    yes it is the hayden tensioner and i think your right about a new chain. thanks for all the input. bill

    i was looking at new primary chains in the jp catalogue and noticed they show a split chain with extra links for my softail. much the way a bicycle chain is. have these been simplified to avoid removing the clutch or am i seeing things? thanks
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 27, 2009
  6. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

    4,630
    68
    99
    Re: new primary chain

    While this might look convenient with respect to NOT having to remove the compensator, clutch basket and old chain to install the new one, I would suggest getting a new HD chain for the bike. I do not like the idea of a potential "weak link" introduced into a pretty stout load environment. If the link goes, it WILL be a mess.

    Pulling the stuff off to change the chain is NOT a big chore. This procedure is for replacing the stator, but the info on removing and then reinstalling the compensator, clutch basket and chain applies. This guy rigged up some pretty imaginative tools!!

    Stator Replacement - Harley Davidson Community

    Only warning about doing this is DO NOT USE AN IMPACT WRENCH ON THE COMPENSATOR NUT. Use a breaker bar with a cheater if you have to. Worse case, you may have to add some heat with a propane torch, but probably not. And remember, the clutch basket nut is a lefty!!

    TQ