Primary chain replacement.

Discussion in 'Transmission' started by dangerdan, Oct 23, 2008.

  1. dangerdan

    dangerdan Junior Member

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    The more I learn from this site , the more problems I find on my bike.

    I checked the adjustment for the primary chain 6 month ago and it was within 5/8" to 7/8" . What I failed to notice at the time was that adjusting bolt was at the very top of its travel.

    Looks like I need a new primary chain and adjusting shoe.

    Here's the question:
    Can I replace the primary chain by only removing the compensator sprocket or does the clutch have to be removed also ?
     
  2. papaseven

    papaseven Member

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    Gotta pull the clutch basket/flywheel assembly too but you don't have to pull the clutch apart.
    It's only another 5 minutes to pull it so no big deal.

    Remember though!!
    The threads on the clutch nut are left hand threads.
    Got to turn it to the right to loosen.

    Geno:D
     
  3. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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    Dan,

    Geno is absolutely right. Both compensator and clutch have to come off and the clutch does have reverse thread. Be sure you do NOT use an impact gun on the compensator nut or the clutch nut. Shouldn't have to.

    When you reassemble, use red loctite or equivalent on both the compensator nut and the clutch nut. Also, follow the book with respect to checking the alignment of the chain.

    While you are at it, consider installing one of the auto tensioners. I use the M6 on both my '91 Dyna and my '03 UC.

    TQ
     
  4. dangerdan

    dangerdan Junior Member

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    Thanks guys.

    At least this is something I fix without sending to HD
     
  5. Marcus

    Marcus New Member

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    I have been struggling to get the compensator nut loose on mine, any tips?
     
  6. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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    I am assuming you have some sort of tool (I use an old tensioner shoe) to put between the chain and sprocket. With that, you need a 1/2 drive breaker bar and possibly a cheater pipe. The book talks about heating the nut with a torch if it won't come loose, but I have never had to.

    TQ
     
  7. NEWHD74FAN

    NEWHD74FAN Experienced Member Retired Moderators

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    Kinda scary thinking about putting a torch to a bike against "heat treated parts", the possibility of oil and gas fumes...and high cost of insurance...the guy who wrote that in the old book was a scribe reflecting an author' single opinion...and I kinda wonder if either is still around!

    When I go to a muffler shop for my cage, I pay 'em to do the deed and "WALK A WAY"... SLOWLY? ... NAH I would run if anywhere near my house, just to see the cutter/welder, sparks falling off and knowing there is 20 gallons of high explosive nearby...bet I'd make a mistake like that just once if I did that...IMHO :small3d038:
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2008
  8. papaseven

    papaseven Member

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    Sometimes you have to resort to an impact to get these off. It actually puts less stress on the other parts than a cheater bar.
    You do need to hold the compensator to keep it from shaking back and forth while using an impact.
    Just hold the compensator with a gloved hand to keep the vibration to a minimum.

    A little heat won't hurt anything and if it's Loctite that's holding you up then it will start to soften at around 400 degrees.

    Put the heat directly on the comp nut and get it hot enough to just make it sizzle when you put a wet finger to it. Get the nut off and let the parts air cool. No water or compressed air. It won't tranfer heat far enough back to hurt either the stator or crank seal if you do it right.

    An impact will probably bust it right loose though.

    Geno
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2008
  9. biscuit

    biscuit Junior Member

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    Hows about if you use a breaker bar,take up all the slack between bar and socket,and all movement slack between the parts in question,then use a hammer to give a short,sharp hit to the end of the breaker bar;in the 'undo' direction.This works just about every time and the shock isn't transferred to the parts your'e worried about.
    Just remember to ensure the socket is on the nut good,tight and square.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 24, 2008
  10. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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    I strongly advise anyone with a pressed crank to AVOID using an impact wrench on the compensator nut. That nut is torqued to over 150 ft-lbs. on the old system, and something high on the new method, and glued with Loctite! Using an impact wrench can accellerate the runout problem these engines are experiencing. You may get away with it a few times, but why risk it. If the runout gets excessive, oil pump problems and worse may be instore.

    TQ