New Pads and Rotors

Discussion in 'Wheels' started by BigEd, Dec 5, 2008.

  1. BigEd

    BigEd Member

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    After the 40% off sale at the dealer, I got lots of upgrades to do this winter. :D First on the plate is new front floating rotors and pads. Going with LRB z-plus pads. I guess I just need a little hand holding. Is this something I need to be doing? Looks as easy as taking off the old rotors and torquing on the new ones. Any gotchas I need to look out for? I know about cleaning everything up with brake cleaner. I have gotten really used to having brakes and don't want too mess things up. If I would be better off having this done by a "qualified" mechanic, I will.

    Second question is: I am not changing the rear rotor at this time. I have read where it may not be a good idea to change pad types. Any problem putting the LRB pads on the rear as well without changing the rotor?

    Thanks,
    BigEd
     
  2. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    Use some heat on the rotor bolts to make it easier to remove, it's needed to soften the locktite on them. Use a torque wrench when installing the new ones as per the manual as far as torquing procedures. Clean the rotors well before riding with brake clean to remove oil and grease.

    Clean the calipers well, here's some info on that.

    Brake Caliper Maintenance - Harley Davidson Community

    Shouldn't be a problem with the two different pads being they are on different axles however I would feel a bit better with the same pads on both. JMHO
     
  3. BigEd

    BigEd Member

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    Thanks Glider,

    How do you feel about changing to the LRB pads on the rear without changing the rotor?
     
  4. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    As long as the rotor is in good shape, just use some fine emery on the surface to kill the glaze and you should be OK.
     
  5. PetieJ

    PetieJ Member

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    Do not really know if this is important to motorcycles or not, but I do use a bed-in procedure for new pads and/or pads and rotors on my Heritage. I have always performed this procedure on my cages and my race car.

    All brake pads must be bedded-in with the rotor they will be used against to maximize brake performance. The bedding-in process involves a gradual build up of heat in the rotors and pad compound. This process will lay down a thin layer of transfer film on to the rotor surface.

    In a safe area, apply brakes moderately from 60mph to 30mph and then drive approximately 1/2 mile to allow the brakes to cool. Repeat this procedure approximately 5 times for each wheel. Front and rear, separately.

    or

    After installing new pads make 6 to 10 stops from approximately 35 mph with moderate pressure. Make an additional two to three hard stops from approximately 40 to 45 mph. Each wheel separately. Do not allow the vehicle to come to a complete stop.When completed with this process, park the vehicle and allow the brakes to cool completely before driving on them again. Do not engage the parking brake until after this cooling process is compete.


    Failure to follow these procedures may result in brake judder, excessive noise, or other difficulties in bedding-in the new brake pads. The pads need a fresh surface to lay down an even transfer film. Residue from the previous pad compound on the surface or an irregular surface on a used rotor will cause the pads to grip-slip-grip-slip as they pass over the rotor surface under pressure. The resulting vibration will cause noise and telegraph vibrations through the suspension and steering wheel. This vibration is known as brake judder or brake shimmy. This is typically caused by an uneven transfer film on the rotor surface or an uneven surface on the rotor not allowing that transfer film to develop evenly. This is often misdiagnosed as a warped rotor.

    Bedding-in new pads and rotors should be done carefully and slowly. Rapid heat build up in the brake system can lead to warped rotors and or glazed brake pads. Most brake pad compounds will take up to 300-400 miles to fully develop an even transfer film on the rotors.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2008
  6. toad451

    toad451 Member

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    I just replaced the rear pads on my Road King with some Lyndall Z-Plus pads. I used Gliders instructions (thanks Glider very detailed and easy to follow) and with only a few hitches got everything put back together. After going for a test ride I took the bag off again to check the pads to be sure they were in place. (I was pretty sure I put them on right but I had to be sure). I noticed the rotor was pretty warm from just going up and down the street and applying the rear brake to slow down. Is this normal for new brake pads? I've never check that rotor after going on a ride so I don't have a reference to how warm or hot the rear rotor will get under normal conditions. I would greatly appreciate any insight into this, especially since I'll be replacing the front pads in a couple of weeks or so.