neutral Issues

Discussion in 'Police Bikes' started by loudandfoul, Nov 18, 2015.

  1. loudandfoul

    loudandfoul Member

    20
    11
    0
    2004 FLHTPI Shifts fine when it's cold. But when it gets warm, I hit neutral alot when shifting. To try to make it not happen, I usually have to bang on the heel shifter harder than i would like to. Stock Tranny, only internal motor work is Andrews 22 cams. Any thoughts.
     
  2. Jeff Klarich

    Jeff Klarich Well-Known Member Contributor

    3,598
    103
    296
    First thing i'd check is the shift linkage adjustment, could use a little tweaking. Another thing to check is a loose tranny arm, they have a habit of stripping out on the shaft and make shifting a challenge.
     
  3. HDDon

    HDDon Experienced Member Contributor Retired Moderators

    5,456
    133
    196
    Before you get into the tranny why not try a different lube. Many of the members here use redline and other products. Be sure to check out Jeff's suggestions first.
     
  4. dolt

    dolt Senior Member Contributor

    1,815
    83
    206
    If none of the above solves the problem, the shift lever centering spring might need adjustment.
     
  5. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

    18,544
    153
    399
    Harley Davidson Forums
    When all else fails try a clutch adjustment, keep in mind when these beasts warm up the dimensions ALL change including the clutch free play
     
  6. loudandfoul

    loudandfoul Member

    20
    11
    0
    Ok, the shifter arm is loose on the shaft coming out of the transmission. I got about 1/4 turn on it before the Allen started to strip. 2 questions: does the arm strip or does the shaft. Second, can the arm be replaced without taking the inner primary off. Thanks in advance, you guys are very helpful.
    [​IMG]
     
  7. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

    18,544
    153
    399
    Buehler Concept and Design :
    Get a hold of these guys



    You can do this repair process yourself or have your tech do it for you. A rotary tool is used to cut the old lever off. The "hi-performance" 1.6 amp Dremel has enough power to do the job. A powerful 5 amp cutting tool without a speed control is a great tool, but not for this job. It requires controlable power. Use a flexible extention shaft and small (7/8 in) cutting wheels. The Dremel 420 is a good size cutting wheel for this job.

    If I have to do a lot of cutting, I like to use Dremel's 540 thicker and larger diameter cutting wheel after I wear it's size down on a piece of scrap metal. Make sure you have good light and the area is clean.
    Disconnect the shift rod and set it aside.
    Take the tightening bolt out of your old lever and without forcing it, see how far it moves around on the shifter shaft. If it does not lay horizontal when pushed forward you will need to start by cutting the arm off the lever.
    Before you start cutting and after the tightening bolt is out, notice the side to side movement of the lever on the tranny shaft. You have some room to move it toward the tranny or the primary to give you more working room.
    Put on your safety goggels and use the cutting wheel to make a vertical cut across the lever to remove enough old clamp to lift it off the shifter shaft.
    Use a telescoping magnet to hold the small piece of lever you are cutting off so you don't have to fish it out of the nooks and crannies in the cases.
    If you contact the tranny's shaft a couple times when you are cutting don't worry, but obviously avoid it.
    Make an even cut across the old lever and see if it will pop apart with a twist of a flathead screwdriver in the cut. If it doesn't pop apart don't force it, cut a little deeper all the way across the lever and try again. Once it's cut deep enough, the remaining metal will snap apart, it is pretty soft metal.
    Use your magnet and get the metal filings out and bolt on the BETTER LEVER.
    Place the top and bottom pieces together so a clamp is formed, not a complete circle.
    Put the longer bolt through the back hole and insert it into the bottom piece one whole turn.
    Slip the BETTER LEVER over the shifter shaft and snug the allen bolt up to bring the two pieces together, but do not tighten all the way yet.
    Put the front bolt in and snug it up, but not all the way.
    Now tighten the rear bolt and then the same for the front.
    Use Locktite hi-performance for permanent use and check for tightness after your first ride around the block.
    Check it again at the end of the day and if you didn
     
  8. Jeff Klarich

    Jeff Klarich Well-Known Member Contributor

    3,598
    103
    296
    The shaft will be fine as it's hardened steel. The shift arm is what gets worn out and can only be tightened so much before it bottoms out and there is no more room to take up the slack.

    Following Jacks post will do the trick, others have replaced theirs by using this method. Good luck and keep us updated.
     
  9. loudandfoul

    loudandfoul Member

    20
    11
    0
    Funny, just finished reading about Better Lever, before I came back here. Going that route, thanks Jack
    [​IMG]