My Stator is Repaired

Discussion in 'Touring Models' started by ironmark, Feb 1, 2012.

  1. ironmark

    ironmark Junior Member

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    Took the bike to the HD dealer and after a few test the tech confirmed that the stator was the problem. For some reason that was not explained to me they replaced the compensator sprocket, I did have the SE compensator sprocket on the bike and the service manger said that they did replace it with another SE compensator sprocket, The service manager only said that there were signs of wear on the compensator and that HD covered it under warranty, I have no way to tell if they did use the SE compensator sprocket unless I take off the outer primary cover the only other way to tell is to see if the bike gets the starter clunk back. The labor was 2.25 hours to replace the stator and the bill total came to $689.49 but I only had to pay $50 because of the ESP. The dealer didn't have the belt in stock so I scraped the belt idea, they did say that they inspected the drive belt and it was in good shape.
     
  2. Hoople

    Hoople Account Removed

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    By chance did you get to see your old stator? It would have been interesting to know if only 1 or 2 poles were discolored in any way. That would make all the pieces of the puzzle fit together.

    The SE comps are another thing all together. The fret rust issues still go on. Would you happen to know which primary lube you were using and what they now installed.
     
  3. ironmark

    ironmark Junior Member

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    They did not show me any of the parts. The work order said the stator had a open ground. As far as the SE compensator, I never had any starter clunk or primary noise and the bike rode and shifted just fine before I took it in, I would think that if the compensator was going bad I would have experience some sort of symptoms before I took the bike in. I am kind of thinking that the tech damage the compensator when he removed it maybe by breaking a tooth off or something like that, I use Mobil 1 20/50 V-Twin oil in the bikes engine and primary, the shop put in HD SYN-3 doing the repair.
     
  4. btsom

    btsom Active Member

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    Look at your work order and see if the compensator part number (numbers) is there. Someone with a parts book can tell which comp they installed. To the best of my knowledge (from having installed the SE comp myself) no component parts are interchangeable between the standard and the SE comps.
     
  5. Hoople

    Hoople Account Removed

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    That is really too bad because so much can be learned by seeing the old parts. I am curious as to what they meant by an "open ground". The stator is an electrically isolated component so I would hope it had an open ground to start with (or was open circuit to ground).

    My guess is the compensator was all fret rusted up so they just installed a new one. When they get that way, you won't even know it unless you take it apart and look at it.

    It's not perfect but I have more confidence using Formula+ in the primary.
     
  6. ironmark

    ironmark Junior Member

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    The compensator part # on the repair order is the SE compensator sprocket 40274-08A the same #'s that are in the 2012 HD P&A catalog. I can't understand on how the compensator sprocket could rust because it is not in water it is in oil all the time, granted it is not completely submerged in oil only about 1/2 way, also my bike doesn't sit much so it wouldn't have time to rust.
     
  7. HDDon

    HDDon Experienced Member Contributor Retired Moderators

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    The fretting or rust looking deposite that takes place is caused by a lack of lubrication between moving part and not the common rust caused by exposier to the elements. This fretting or movement without adequate lubrication causes the metal to produce a fine red or rust colored sludge. Some of our members have ground slots or groves into their SE comp. sprockets trying to get the lub. into the area where the fretting is occuring.
     
  8. Hoople

    Hoople Account Removed

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    I agree 100%. You would think with all the oil flying around caused by chain travel, nothing could possibly be bone dry. But what happens is the stack of convex pressure washers (springs) pushes a hub arbor up tight against the 3 spoke gear and outside gland nut. The clearance is so tight, it does not allow oil to get inside. The hub of the 3 spoke gear wheel rocks back & forth without any lube. Amazed me the 1st time I took mine apart after just 3K miles. Bone dry orange baby powder rust.

    Like HD-Don says,, It is not really rust caused from conventional oxidation. It is more like two metals vibrating against each other (micro-motion) without any lube.
     

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  9. ironmark

    ironmark Junior Member

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    Amazing who would think that this would happen. Well lets just hope that someone can come up with a new and improved version.
     
  10. kemo

    kemo R.I.P

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    Do you know the revised part number for the new SE compensator. I believe that Harley came out with a new design that had some grooving to allow oil to get into the dry area.
    Ken