Lollipop Baffles without welding

Discussion in 'Engine, Fuel and Exhaust' started by BOBFLHTC, Jan 6, 2010.

  1. BOBFLHTC

    BOBFLHTC Active Member

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    As one of my winter projects I decided to try and make some old time Lollipop baffles using a ¼ 20 bolt and a 1 ½ “ washer. I ordered a reconditioned welder from Ebay to weld them together but the welder didn’t work. Fortunately the seller refunded the purchase price plus shipping. After some thought I remembered the Pop riveter hanging on the shelf. Most of the cars I used to own required some body repair. I picked up 2 Thumb screws from Lowe’s and drilled them and the washers out and Pop riveted them together which worked out pretty well . I then ground down the screw portion on opposite sides in line with the washer so I would know the position of the baffle in the Header pipe and could hold it in place with pliers while securing it with a nut. I would recommend placing a die all the way up the threads so you can repair them after grounding them down. It knocked about 4-5 decibels off and increased the low end torque some.
     
  2. dangerdan

    dangerdan Junior Member

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    Did you use all steel rivets or aluminum.
     
  3. BOBFLHTC

    BOBFLHTC Active Member

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    I had some bigger Stainless steel rivets so I used them. I figure its an option that I can use with muffler baffles if I need more pressure and less noise.
    Thanks for reading - Bob
     
  4. dangerdan

    dangerdan Junior Member

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    Bob I did the same thing last year, but welded mine in place. I'm not convinced a rivit will hold up in all that heat and pressure.
    A new baffle was about $150.00. :small3d023:

    I did notice some minor increase in bottom end performance. I'm running 80 CC so I am not to concerned about maximum HP. The bike is 15 yrs old , it runs great and gets about 45 MPG and thats all that matters.
     
  5. BOBFLHTC

    BOBFLHTC Active Member

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    Dangerdan It’s very possible that you are right about the rivets not holding up and it would probably be a good idea having a spare on a longer trip. I guess that’s one of the risks you run trying unconventional solutions. I see you are riding a vintage bike too which helps explain your willingness to experiment.

    If I may digress a little there seems to be two approaches to motorcycle modification and maintenance. On the one hand there is the approach suggesting that you should only use factory approved products installed by a certified mechanic. I find myself closer to the other extreme. I think most of us find ourselves somewhere along that spectrum. I doubt if I’ll start making my own pistons anytime soon like the Anthony Hopkins character in the “World’s Fastest Indian” but I like to tinker. It’s not just about the money because sometimes it winds up costing more. The first question I ask myself is there some way I can improvise? Or use a material that doesn’t have the word motorcycle associated with it (which automatically jacks up the price). A while back my clutch bracket was washed out from use so I drilled it out and made a bushing out of brass pipe. It wasn’t cost effective if you look at how long it took but I enjoyed doing it. I could supply plenty of other examples. I don’t think there is a right or wrong approach.

    If motorcycling isn’t about doing what you enjoy doing the way you enjoy doing it than what is it about?