loctite 262 vs. 271

Discussion in 'Transmission' started by glimmerman, Feb 18, 2011.

  1. glimmerman

    glimmerman Active Member

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    ok, got my primary stuff and did the lapping. went to get a new tube of red 262. stopped at napa where i got the valve grinding compound to lap the compensator parts. permatex/napa red 271. same name blue 242 and green 290. dash over to the depot. red 271. buy it and call the toll free hotline for red 262. Henkel Corp. in CT. have to talk to industrial division. seems that 262 is not recommmend for auto service and its use is a misapplication of the product.
    now i'm getting hot. said if h-d says to use 262, it means 2-6-2 and not 2-7-1. find out i have to go to an industrial supply house like msc or graingers to get it. not available at auto parts stores. does it ever get easier or am i too old. my money is green. it used to spend everywhere. now nobody wants it except the crooks.
     
  2. fin_676

    fin_676 Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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  3. Chopper

    Chopper Senior Member

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    I've been using 262 as recommended by Harley for more then 10 years on every cam job I've done and never a problem, it's always worked great for me.
     
  4. Hoople

    Hoople Account Removed

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    I hear what your saying but I myself would not get too carried away with using the exact Loctite number. Type 271 & 262 are very similar to each other. I have used both and found the 271 to cure pretty fast, almost while your tightening the bolt. The viscosity of 271 is thinner also.

    When you really think about it, your suppose to use a Primer on the threads before you use either type. And how many people really do it? I bet not many. So if we are not really following the rule book when it comes to the application of the product, how big of a difference will it make to use 271 over 262.

    According to the Loctite catalog, there really is not much difference in both products. Viscosity being the main one that I see.

    But I can understand you wanting to follow the book to the T. That is a Good habit to have. I just would not read too deep into it.
     
  5. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

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    Hoople is right on here and all thread surfaces should be cleaned and dry, you might want to even use a thread chaser first:s
     
  6. glimmerman

    glimmerman Active Member

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    thanks. the comp bolt and the sealing bolts are pre-lubed. i will use the 271 on the clutch. i took the advice and cleaned the bolts and bolt holes with brake cleaner and used a set of bore brushes from the shotgun, rifle and pistol kits i have laying around. appreciate all the help i've been getting here. on another note- went to match mark the extention shaft, am slider and sprocket. used a good center punch and it shattered the tip, putting a piece in my hand. got out the starrett center punch and same deal. broken punch, another chunk in my hand. now i'm bleeding and cussing. what material do we have here. tuffest forging material i've come across in 40 yrs. as a boilermaker.
     
  7. Hoople

    Hoople Account Removed

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    You'll live. Be thankful it didn't hit you in the eye.
    Those gears are only surface harden but your right they are hard. It took a carbide bit to cut the grooves, but once through the surface, it cuts like butter.
     
  8. glimmerman

    glimmerman Active Member

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    thax hoop. always wear safety glasses. can't see w/o them. 4 lenses and i'm still blind, lol.
     
  9. NEWHD74FAN

    NEWHD74FAN Experienced Member Retired Moderators

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    Glimmerman...entertaining post to be sure...welcome to the weekender "knuckle buster crowd" your in good company. Hoop has you covered -- along with the safety glasses...! :s
     
  10. man in black

    man in black Member

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    I realize that this is an old thread but I ran across it researching Loctite 262 for use on brake parts that have no flared seats like the pressure valves ( 2 pound blue and 10 pound red used on street rod applications ) When I bought a couple of these valves they already came with this red 262 Loctite as the only sealer on the fittings and in my research I found that it is the only Loctite that is resistant to brake fluid. I was skeptical but apparently it works. Don't know about the 271 being equivalent in that regard.