i removed my crank case plug......

Discussion in 'Touring Models' started by baharp, Apr 19, 2016.

  1. baharp

    baharp Member

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    did my first full service my self on my 09 RG. boy was i proud, but removed the plug that was labeled " DO NOT REMOVE" in the service manual pictures. But no big deal, i removed it after i drained the oil when i was looking for that pesky "hidden" tranny drain plug. I tightened back in, no fluid came out no harm. But then i took her out for her maiden voyage over the weekend and noticed that it sounded like i had an exhaust leak from the rear header at the manifold. Did i cause an issue by removing the crank case plug?? I saw a few other post's on this topic but i didn't really find the answers i was looking for really? So i thought is this an urban legend that you should't remove this plug? Or is there a potential for consequence for removal of said plug? any advise and or help would be great, thanks
     
  2. dbmg

    dbmg Experienced Member

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    The plug you removed is the one when installing a oil pressure gauge. There are 3 bolts that are removes to drain the 3 oils. Did you use a Allen to remove? And left of drain plug? No correlation to exhaust leak.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2016
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  3. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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    Was the "plug" you removed at the bottom, center of the crankcase? And was it a pipe plug? If so, it is a plug sealing one of the holes used in the manufacturing process. It should have been secured with a thread sealant (like Locktite red). Should have been pretty hard to remove which is why everyone advises against removing it so as not to take a chance of damaging the crankcase.

    When you reinstalled the plug, did you use sealant? The only concern in reinstalling the pipe plug is over-tightening it and cracking the case by mistake. If that had happened though, it is very likely that oil would be coming out of that area of the case pretty seriously. So if that is not happening, then I do not believe you ended up with a problem associated with removing and reinstalling the crankcase plug.

    Any other symptoms you have like an exhaust leak at the rear header is purely coincidental. You should chase that down however.

    Cheers,

    TQ
     
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  4. baharp

    baharp Member

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    Yes it was an Allen head right by the oil drain plug. I'm glad that it has nothing to do with what sounds like an ehaxhaust leak. Thank you


    I did use a little sealant. I have not noticed any leaking at all. It sat for about 2 weeks after I did the service. And I have not noticed any leaking after our 100 mile ride. Thank you for your response. I'm hoping that I didn't do any thing by taking it out. From I've read everyone just says leave that plug alone! And I didn't! So maybe I'm just being a nervous Nancy about it. Thank you for yiur advice.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 20, 2016
  5. Breeze3at

    Breeze3at Well-Known Member

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    Baharp; Just to clarify this plug thing; There are TWO Allen head plugs under the bike. One is in the oil pan, threads in horizontal and close to the drain plug. This is the one often used for oil temp gauges. The other is on the belly of the crankcases, just to one side of the case seam, and threads in vertical. This is the one you are not supposed to remove, because it's a tapered pipe thread, and can cause the case to crack if over tightened. Either way, it seems you did no harm.
     
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  6. Jeff Klarich

    Jeff Klarich Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Try re-torquing the header bolts, torque when engine is cold.
     
  7. baharp

    baharp Member

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    Will give it a try. Thanks
     
  8. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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    As Breeze said above, if the pipe plug is #3 shown below, that is not the pipe plug I was concerned about in my post above. This is a tapered pipe threaded plug, but not the one that is worrisome to mess with. As mentioned by dbmg and Breeze3AT, this is the usual spot to install the oil temp sending unit for an oil temp gauge.

    [​IMG]
    Cheers,

    TQ
     
  9. BUBBIE

    BUBBIE Well-Known Member

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    You may have to loosen the pipe covers (snake skins) a little, to get easy access to the Header Flange Bolt Nuts... Usually loosened they will move far enough to let the 1/2" long socket in easily.... CAREFUL of the FENDER when you get to the front pipe flange........ Tools will leave unwanted Chips and Scratch marks....... Turning the bars to open the BOTTOM of the fender, away from the Handle of the tool, you'll be safer from DINGS...

    I had a loose set in the front (little noise too) and got about a 3/4+ turn on both....
    Quiet Now..... SMILE

    ALSO, Don't snap a stud... I spay the nuts with ? your choice lube (WD40) Before Tightening.... it helps in tightening the 1/2 nuts, not fighting DRY n DIRTY Threads...

    signed....BUBBIE
     
  10. dolt

    dolt Senior Member Contributor

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    Just to clarify for anyone that might be interested, there is no issue with removing the crank case plug (the taboo "do not remove" plug) in the right side of the belly of the case. Removing that plug is the only way to check for sumping which often occurs, even with pros, when installing cams. Best to remove that plug, slowly, when the cases are up to operating temps which is a condition of checking for sumping; checking cold, particularly on a softail will not produce accurate information. When installing, as has been pointed out, the plug is a tapered pipe plug and should not be over tightened. Some Loctite thread sealant, not thread locker, should be used.

    So, do not be afraid to remove that plug; however, that said, checking for sumping is the only reason that plug should be removed..........;)
     
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