I Did My 10K Service

Discussion in 'Other Service and Maintenance' started by Joyflyin, Dec 25, 2008.

  1. Joyflyin

    Joyflyin Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator

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    Okay folks, I finally completed my 10K service for my 05 deuce. Yeah, it took me about a month, but not because it was all that difficult, mainly because I have spent a bunch of time driving back & forth to WV. Family stuff to deal with, but I finally got the bike completed.

    I don't want to mislead you all, I don't break any records on speed when I work on the bike, but I probably only worked on it 2 afternoons. I got the checklist off the forum, (the same one that is in the manual, but easier to print). I can now print it from my manual on CD I got from Gary12850. I read over the list, then looked every thing up on the forum & in the manual to make sure I wanted to try this.

    I started the project on a warm day, got the ride in & did the oil changes first. I then methodically started working through the check list. Now this is where I would really screw up the dealers allotted time for the job. Most of the stuff is basic, and some of the stuff really scared me. I would get to something new to me, & I would read the service manual, then look on the forum. Yes, I had my computer in the shop, air card plugged in & HDTalking pulled up to refresh.

    I will give you all the quick run down here. Oil changes went okay, I have done that before. Basic stuff like checking the air and all was okay. I had a bad case of fear with the clutch adjustment. Mine was working okay, so I was scared to mess with it. But, I watched the videos in the self help forum a half dozen times, then dove in. It went well, (we'll say so far, :s) but I did learn a trick about loosening the nut on the clutch plate, for the tough ones, a good wallop on the handle of the ratchet will usually break it loose; for those of us with tender hands, a 'soft' hammer will work. I used one of hubbies plastic hammers. After that, follow the directions in the self help section & on the video. You'll be fine.

    My other scare was when I got to the fork oil. Having the deuce, I of course had to remove the front wheel. I got a little spooked there. I had to talk to my consultant to get through that. :s So I got the wheel off and did the fork oil change. I could have used that frozen fastener tool for those drain screws. I didn't chew mine up too bad, but I will replace them next time around. The problem I had was that they were so tight that even though I was pushing the screwdriver in very firm, when I would try to turn it, the metal in the screw head would twist, it just made the edges kind of rough on the head. I was lucky that I didn't strip the heads out, (hubby isn't here to save me, & the HD shop is of course closed). But, the fork oil wasn't too bad, once I got the oil drained, the rest was relatively easy.

    So, when I put the wheel back on, all looked well, so I lowered the bike, getting ready to run it into the wall, yep, a little birdie Glided by & told me to leave the slider cap screws loose and put the front wheel against the wall and bounce the front as hard as I can, no brakes, then torque the slider cap nuts to spec. This makes the front forks parallel with each other and keeps the front end from binding. :s Thanks Glider!

    So, those were the 2 toughest parts for me. The rest was fairly straight forward. Just kind of time consuming, for me at least, since my bike looks so cool & all, for me to get to most of the nuts & bolts, I had to take off all those stupid covers......:newsmile070: I bet the 'real' mechanics hate those stupid things! I put them back on though, what can I say, I like the looks. :)

    I was surprised at how easy changing the spark plugs was though. :s I didn't even have to ask for help on that. :D

    And, the best news was, that after it was all said & done, the old girl fired right up! I didn't have to use the choke or anything. :newsmile01: I was thrilled. I was a bit worried about that, the battery tender was in the front garage & the bike was in the back. Now both bikes are in the toy box with the battery tenders waiting on warm weather.

    I ran the bike for about 15 minutes tonight and the night I changed the oils, I also added some Seafoam in the tank. Hopefully this spring I won't have to take it in to my local wrench for the 'real' 10K service, it only has 9K on it now, this was a practice. If it didn't work, I was going to pay the pros this spring.

    So, now with the money I saved, I may have to look into getting that speedo/tach I'm eyeballing; or maybe the chrome rear swing arm, but I think the tach would be more 'practical'. :D

    Next up!
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. NEWHD74FAN

    NEWHD74FAN Experienced Member Retired Moderators

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    Joy, great job and for those who are tentative about doing service on your bike or have it done, just remember, research, preparation, setting aside time, work area and finally, gathering the right tools with the proper supplies is the key.

    The more you know the more you can followup and at the very least check on the work done, knowing what procedures are required to do the 10K maintenance right. Knowledge is power and protects you, your ride and especially your loved ones! :ap
     
  3. Davidw2415

    Davidw2415 Senior Member

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    Joy and others; a tip if I may. when removeing stubborn screws I found a good method to use is to first of all make sure the screw driver is the right size for the screw. I've seen a lot of poeple try to use over or undersized screwdrivers for the job they were doing. then use a hamer to tap on the end of the screwdriver and turn the screwdriver while tapping. And remember, be patient.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2008
  4. NEWHD74FAN

    NEWHD74FAN Experienced Member Retired Moderators

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    Glider has a post on the proper tool I used for many years on my "metric" bikes since the 70's...a manual "impact wrench" tool with hardened phillips and slot head 1/4" hex drive attachments. And yes, do make sure you select the proper size, and suprise, the larger diameter of the tool handle makes it easier to check fit and remove fasteners without the need to use the impact option, but sometimes it will be necessary, especially if Loctite was used to secure the threads and plenty of "curing time" i.e. years...:s
     
  5. Joyflyin

    Joyflyin Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator

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    Thanks for the tip David. That is very important. Trust me, I had every different attachment I could to verify that I had the right tool. The dad blame things were in there. I don't want to say my husband is anal, but let me see, he saw a crescent wrench out, (I was trying to figure out a way to get the screws out without taking the wheel off), and I believe his exact words were 'don't ever use a crescent wrench on that bike' :D See why I have to be extra careful on these projects, I don't want to have to tell him I screwed it up that bad. :bigsmiley33: For the record, the crescent wrench wasn't for the bike, it was to try & turn a bit, but it still wouldn't fit.

    But seriously, he takes good care of me, but he is adamant about using the correct tool for the job. If I don't know what to do, I stop & resort to my research, I'll ask hubby for his opinion, and then go back later to tackle with a fresh mind.
     
  6. Joyflyin

    Joyflyin Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator

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    I wish I would have known about that tool earlier. :D I wonder why he posted that?? :D Sad part is, we probably have one of those tools out there, but I didn't see it in the screwdriver drawer, not that I would have known what I was looking for anyway, but now I know.
     
  7. NEWHD74FAN

    NEWHD74FAN Experienced Member Retired Moderators

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    Joy, don't feel bad, guys in the know usually learn from experience...we have all damaged fasteners...many people don't know that many fasteners are designed to be installed only once...and phillips head were designed to prevent the user from overtightening (besides the convenience)...no worries.:D
     
  8. Davidw2415

    Davidw2415 Senior Member

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    Joy your husband is a lucky man. I can't even get my wife to add her own washer fluid and over the last 31 years I know I've shown her how to to it at least 31 times. In fact we have a light fixture in our kitchen that has two burned out bulbs and I know they won't get changed unless I do it but I always try to hold out as long as I can just to see if she might actually attempt it.
     
  9. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    Excellent point Dave. Not everyone knows that especially with allen screwdrivers that they have sizes like #2.#3-#4 and using the wrong one will chew up the head in no time. It has to seat into the screw properly and bottom out in the head.

    Some make a mistake and use a reading prince screwdriver which resembles a Phillips but the difference is in the tip. The allen has a slightly rounded tip and the reading has a pointed tip, real easy to strip out an allen screw with that without even trying.
     
  10. Davidw2415

    Davidw2415 Senior Member

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    the things we do for love!