Front Forks - '04 FLHRCI

Discussion in 'Touring Models' started by FLHRCI_Bob, May 16, 2011.

  1. FLHRCI_Bob

    FLHRCI_Bob New Member

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    I am looking for some advice on front fork work on a '04 FLHRCI, roughly 60k on miles.

    I disassembled the nacelle and everything to change the front fork oil. After doing the change, I lowered the bike before putting the nacelle back together and compressed the forks a couple of times. I was surprise to see that the left side fork tube now had oil on it. It did not before the change of fork oil. I did replace the fork cap nut seal and I did torque the fork cap nuts to 60 ft-lbs as per the manual spec. I did use a funnel and carefully put in the oil, precisely measured to 11.1 ozs. The right fork is clean, no oil.

    I am a book mechanic. No pro shop experience, just pick-up a book, read the procedure and execute it. I have successfully installed new handlebars with internal wiring, r & r'd wheels (front and rear), installed auto primary chain adjuster, installed new speedometer (digital, multi-function), oil pressure and oil temp gauges (mount to handlebar shroud, what a task to get the temp sending unit in the "L" shaped hose from the tank to the crankcase), drivers seat backrest bracket. Obviously I do my own routine maintenance. So I think I am better then average, but certainly no pro. Now my questions -

    1. For the guys with experience in rebuilding forks (Road King is conventional right and left), I have the manual, can I do this job myself?

    2. Are there work arounds for the necessary tools -

    A. Fork Tube Holder (HD-41177)
    B. Fork Oil Seal Installer (HD-34634)

    3. The fork tube plug does not seem very accessible, yet must be removed and must be set to a torque specification (very wide ( 22 - 58 ft-lbs ). There are flats on the plug, but I am not sure what tool would be used on them. What is the trick to this removal, and how do you use a torque wrench on this part while reinstalling?

    3. Manual recommends an air impact wrench to remove the 6mm screw from end of fork slider. I do not have a compressor or air tools. Can this be done manually?

    4. There is a local shop owned and operated by a trained Harley tech who has done work for me in the past, and I believe is a top notch tech. If I r & r the forks he would probably be happy to rebuild, how much time would he need to do the rebuild, and is this a job better left to someone trained given my skill set?

    Thanks for any advice.

    Bob
     
  2. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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  3. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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    Yes, you can do it. Everything is straight forward from the HD Factory Service Manual.

    On the screw from the bottom of the fork slider, once you break it lose, you can use an electric drill to spin the bolt free. Just need speed once it is broken free.

    No special tools for that type of fork. But as a note, roll your tubes on a known flat surface to make sure they are not bent. You can wait until Momma goes to do the shopping and take them in the kitchen and do it on the granite countertops! Make sure you clean up good.

    When you get all reassembled and put in the oil volume specified, measure the air gap on both sides and make sure they are within 1/8" between the two sides. Obviously, bike upright and level.

    TQ
     
  4. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

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    The hard part will be deciding what fork oil you want to use for your style of riding, with the self help section and some patience and time you can do it IMO:s
     
  5. FLHRCI_Bob

    FLHRCI_Bob New Member

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    To Glider/Jack/TQ - thanks for all your input. Really appreciate it. Someone on another forum posed the question on where the oil on the slider came from, was I really sure? Was it perhaps me being a little sloppy?

    So per his suggestion I cleaned up all very well, Put the bike on the ground again and pumped the forks vigorously again, and voila, no sign of oil on either fork slider. People who see the obvious and simple are so smart!

    So, since I have had no fork performance issues, I can now invest my time in detailing the nacelle, the headlight trim, the guage mounts and containers, the handlebar shroud, the turn signals, driving lamps and associated bar, and the windshield brackets and reassemble all shiny and bright (wearing my rubber goves of course). It will at least be perfectly shiny and bright in the garage until I ride it and hit that first juicy bug with an inaccessible area!

    Thanks again.
    Bob
     
  6. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    Bob

    Skip the rubber gloves and just use some Pledge on it when you're done. :D

    Try the link I posted for you the next time you change the fork oil.:s

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