Do you ride a bicycle?

Discussion in 'General OFF TOPIC' started by Romain, Feb 6, 2009.

  1. Romain

    Romain Active Member

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    I ride my Sorty back and forth through the mad traffic of London daily regardless of the weather (almost) without worries, feeling as safe as one can on two wheels.

    A couple of days ago, for old time sake I decided to do a run on a push bike.
    I couldn't believe how unsafe and threaten by the other road users I felt. I never have had these feelings on a motorbike. Without the possibility to give the throttle a quick squeeze if necessary, being much more difficult to see and without the protective gear I felt extremely vulnerable.

    It has given me a new sense of respect for cyclists (even though I think that they should stop when the traffic lights are red as other road users).
     
  2. STEVE07

    STEVE07 Well-Known Member Staff Member Super Moderators

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    I leave my bike at the lake because I enjoy riding the trails and country roads I can't imagine peddling a bike through the city anymore
     
  3. Davidw2415

    Davidw2415 Senior Member

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    I ride mostly on bike trails rarely on roads. Here bicycle riders over 16 are supposed to follow the same laws as other drivers. We are lucky here; there a bike trails all over the place.
     
  4. NEWHD74FAN

    NEWHD74FAN Experienced Member Retired Moderators

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    Bicycle riding in traffic can be daunting, especially if one has not done it in awhile. I for one started my two wheeled sports love affair on a bicycle when only a kid, so traffic jamming skills were learned early and continued on to my adult life including road racing, mountain bike single track and trail riding. Yes, bicycle riding in today's traffic is particularly bad these days, especially on busy surface streets.

    Being a motorcyclist, you are very aware of closing speed distances and able to adjust your speed and braking rapidly to match. But a bicycle does not have quite the power or maneuverablility to get out of the way of unattentive cagers and is certainly more dangerous. Statistically it is the most hazardous mode of transportation and cause of serious injuries in adult AND children of any consumer item, as rated by any measure from a medical or insurance perspective.

    The key here is as with all things, anything worth doing is worth doing well...practice on your machine, you should be able to pull up on the bar and "jump small curbs" with ease, then unweight the rear as it clears, and other skill maneuvers that you see your kids do...they do it for fun, you do it for survival. Once you have improved your skill set you work on your mental and tactical skills...sound like Motorcycling 101...? Your right, but your comfort level and skill will rise to equal the task, and you will learn to ride and feel confidence knowing you ride like a pro and accept the risks as small part of the overall benefit of just going out and riding/pedaling.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2009
  5. mrkihn

    mrkihn Active Member

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    if I have to run somewhere quick and it only 1-2 miles away I use the mounting bike. Use to peddle to work every day.
    Not good to fire the scooter up just to do a 5 minute ride
     
  6. DDogg

    DDogg Junior Member

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    My wife had a heart attack 5 years ago so I went out and bought us each a mountain bike for exercise. I'll have to admit, after buying my FatBob last summer, I didn't do to much bicycyle riding. We also have trails to ride. I'm to old to deal with traffic if I'm pedaling.
     
  7. cedarbrook63

    cedarbrook63 Junior Member

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    I cycle to work regularly. I'm lucky in that I cycle through parks and quiet streets to get there. Used to work in a hospital in a big city and was knocked off my bike TWICE in the space of 2 months by small ladies (I'm not being sexist here) sitting high in BIG four wheel drives. I had right of way at a T junction each time, but they just didn't see me. The first lady stopped to see if I was ok (I was), the second just drove off:bigsmiley19:. Gave up cycling in the city after that and got in the cage.:( Even on a scoot with presence, like a Harley, you have to make sure that cagers don't boss you around on the road or they'll land you in trouble.
     
  8. Ken S.

    Ken S. Active Member

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    I bet you felt the same way when you first started to ride a motorcycle through traffic. Keep riding the pedal bike and your comfort level will rise.

    How did you feel as a young lad riding a bicycle? Fine I'd bet. It's all about what you are used to and what you feel comfortable and confident riding.
     
  9. SportyHawg

    SportyHawg Active Member

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    I have a road bike. Did the TOSRV (Tour of the Scioto River Valley) several times (over 1000 cyclists) -- from Columbus down to Portsmouth and back. A two-day trip, 110 miles one way.

    They are constructing a bike path that goes from a local park here connecting to a park 3 miles from where I work. 16 miles one way. Can't wait until that is complete. I'll be riding both bikes to work, although not simultaneously!

    I don't mind the car traffic. But then, I always ride on rural roads.
     
  10. Sharky1948

    Sharky1948 Junior Member

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    While the FLHR and XL1200C have cut into my cycling time, my wife and I do like to cycle for exercise. Lots of nice back country, rolling roads to put in 50 miles for some refreshing exercise.

    I like riding with my 23 year old son too. But he has biked across country and is a pretty competitive cyclist...hard to keep up. (I try to give him a ring right after he's had a tough workout. He won't turn me down and I have a fighting chance of keeping up!)