Clutch tool

Discussion in 'Transmission' started by wildey, Aug 17, 2009.

  1. wildey

    wildey Active Member

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    Well I went to adjust my clutch on my 08 Ultra the other day, usually I just let the dealer do it when I have them do my service, but since cash has been tight I did my own 10,000 mile service.

    I saw my nut had been rounded off from the techs using open end wrenches to tighten the clutch while holding the allen and I thought this is stupid.

    I also see where many folks have talked about welding a nut onto a socket so the allen fits though it.

    So I went to my tool box and what I found works the best is an 1 inch off set box end wrench. It fits perfectly 11/16th and comes right out of the primary like it was made for it.

    Here is a link for craftsman which has them for $15 Just thought it might make it easier for others and no more slipped wrenches or rouned nuts.

    Craftsman Professional 5/8 x 11/16 in. Full Polish Deep Offset Wrench, 12 pt. Box End
     
  2. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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    That's the one! Sorry to see someone messed up the lock nut on your adjuster. Makes a simple quick job last ALL DAY!!

    TQ
     
  3. Dr. Dolittle

    Dr. Dolittle Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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    Thanks. I'm going to do as much of my 10,000 mile service as I feel comfortable with sometime next month. This was the main item I couldn't do at 5,000 miles because I didn't have the right tool and I did NOT want my nut rounded off like yours ended up. Sears, here I come!
     
  4. wildspirit97

    wildspirit97 Senior Member

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  5. jody7734

    jody7734 Active Member

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    Harbor freight, what a great toy store with ridiculous prices.

    I have a 6 point offset from snapon. Will this work or do you need the wiggle of the 12 point.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 18, 2009
  6. wildey

    wildey Active Member

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    6 point will work, I just happen to have a 12 and mine is actually a snap on too, but as long as its 1 inch off set which most are it fits perfect.

    Someone else mentioned doing their own 10,000 mile too. It took me 2 hrs and I did everything on the list!! The only part that was inconvient was having to remove the voltage reg to get to the front two engine mounting bolts and also having to move the right rear saddle bag guard to get to the banjo bolts on the abs module. But it was still easy and only took an extra 10 min or so.

    I also happen to have 3 torque wrenches at home too so I just set them at different values so I didn't have to keep adjusting them, but most of them are all pretty close. Just use your service manual Critical Fastener chart for them.

    Now I know why everyone else says do it yourself LOL Just took hard times for me to do it. But after finding some things not torqued right I feel a whole lot better going down the road knowing its RIGHT
     
  7. jody7734

    jody7734 Active Member

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    Thanks. I've always done all of my own maintainence on all of my bikes. I brought my first new bike, kawi zx-9, for it's break in service and that was the last time. The bike had button shims for the lifters and a valve clearance check/adjustment was the most important part of the 1st service. I put dots of clear nail polish on the valve cover bolts just to make sure that they were taken off. Sure enough when picking the bike up the polish was in tact. The asked the tech who woked on my bike if he needed to sawp any shims, and he said that all of them were right in the middle of the range. When I pointed out that bolts had been removed he tried to tell me that they had a way to check them without removing the covers...
     
  8. wildey

    wildey Active Member

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    He's right!! they do have a way to tell. The use their ears and if they don't hear any ticking their just right!!!

    I have a friend who was a toyota mechanic for almost 20 years. Those had solid lifters and required lifter adjustments every 15,000 miles back then. He told me when they ran the engine if it didn't tick or sound funny they just washed it up and called it good but still raked in the cash.

    Pretty disgusting if you ask me plus they are ripping people off. Like I said earlier, it took a pay cut to make me start doing some stuff which I thought was rather tough to do, that is until I read all the info in the forums and the service manual and tried it myself.

    Some things I will still pay to have done I THINK LOL Like front fork oil, belt changes. I will see how cash flow is when I need any of those. But I sure enjoy my ride better knowing I did it myself and its RIGHT!
     
  9. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    Don't sell yourself short, those services are easy to do. There's tips in the self help forum to show you how including videos.
     
  10. Dr. Dolittle

    Dr. Dolittle Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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    I see where both of you are coming from and I agree with both of you. For me anyway, it is a process that will take time. Even with the service manual and the great tips on this forum, there are many procedures that just plain scare me to death. Electrical stuff is foremost but wheel removal is right up there. I started with fluid changes only and then progressed on to doing almost all of my mods myself - speaker upgrade, floorboard extenders, detachable tour pack. I envision a day where I will be almost as confident as Glider and all the other folks on here who do everything for themselves but I'm just not there yet. Sometimes I get to feeling inadequate when I read about what everyone else is doing but I've got to learn to accept my degree of experience in this area and simply be patient.