Carb Rebuild Kit Question

Discussion in 'Touring Models' started by bus driver, Jan 17, 2011.

  1. bus driver

    bus driver Member

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    I bought a 91 Ultra Classic Electra Glide which I believe is completely stock and only has 20,000 miles on it. ( I was told it was owned by a little old Lady that only rode it to church on Sundays) The guy also sold me a bridge with it, what a deal. All kidding aside it appears to be completely stock and has the original CVH carb. I know it needs a rebuild because the plugs show signs of being rich and I think the float is acting up because I am loosing fuel through the floatbowl overflow hose. I suspect (EDIT) in the carb because the tank is rusty and needs to be relined. My question is should I go to Harley for a rebuild kit or try an after market kit? Does Harley use their own kit or a aftermarket kit? Is it worth the extra money, if any. Or if it's cheap enought just put a new carb on it. It is a pleasure to ride and it runs great otherwise.I waited my whole life for it and i'm glad I made the final step up. Thanx for your advise.

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 17, 2011
  2. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

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    CV Carburetor Jet Adjustment/Trouble Shooting - Harley Davidson Community a Harley kit will work fine, drop the float bowl clean it out good run some sea foam in the tank first:s
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 17, 2011
  3. Bodeen

    Bodeen Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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    Not sure if Harley sells a "kit"? I thought you had to buy it all separately. Could be my wonderful dealers way............. Anyway I have used aftermarket kits from J&P without an issue. Stay away from the gimmicks Thunder This and such have you), you dont need them IMHO.

    Bodeen
     
  4. ultra...good

    ultra...good Banned

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    Have to agree with Jack here, try some sea foam, or gumout first and see what happens. I would clean that tank out first and make sure that is ok or else you are just wasting your time as you will just end up with more junk in the carb again. If there is only 20,000 on it, you should not need a rebuild yet.
     
  5. karlsbike

    karlsbike Active Member

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    Hey Bus Driver
    Welcome to the forum, and for having just bought Harley's finest vintage!
    The CV carb is a good one, but I do recommend you to get a rebuild kit:

    Although the scoot has seen very little road mileage, it's been sitting for a long time and rubber parts are probably dried out. You need to open up the carb completely for cleaning, so you should replace the diaphragm for the accelerator pump, new O-ring for the float bowl, and a new O-ring for the accelerator nozzle. Oh, and new gasket for the carb to air box as well.

    With the kit (I've used various aftermarket ones mostly with success...) you'll also get a new float valve, which could be useful. There seems to be some slight variations with these and during my last rebuild I had to swap back to the old valve as I could not get the new one to close properly - it was ever so slightly longer than the old one.

    You need to set the level of your float correctly - use a piece of clear tubing connected to the overflow, tape it up along the carb so that you can see the level inside, should be to just below the bowl flange. Sometimes the valve sticks probably caused by dirt getting stuck on the valve seat causing your leakage (if it leaks you could try to run the carb dry, i.e. close the petcock and let the bike idle until it dies).

    The diaphragm for the CV slide (under the top cover) is tricky to get back sometimes - it seems to grow when taken out. IF this is your first Cv rebuild you should not open it unless you need to. This means; clean out the jets and passages carefully, put it together with new rubber stuff, set the level and see how it behaves. IF you have a torn diaphragm the slide will not operate well, and you will notice.

    As for the tank, personally I'm sceptical to the various tank linings as they may do more damage than good unless the tank is absolutely spotless inside. A good clean-out should be sufficient. I've never used any lining, but taken care to preserve the inside with motor oil during the long winter months. I take about a litre - quart - or so of oil & gas mix, and turn the tank upside-down to make sure all surfaces are covered (yes, I do take off the tank first;).
     
  6. bus driver

    bus driver Member

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    Thanx for all of your great advise. I've waited my whole life for this bike and i couldn't be happier. The bike isn't new but neither am I. (i've been riding for 44 years).
    P.S. Now you tell me to take the tank off first. Thanx again
     
  7. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

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    Run some Seafoam thru it first, cleaning the tank can be a big plus
     
  8. fin_676

    fin_676 Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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    Almost every job i do on the bike i take the tank and seat off and put them out of the way in the other shed as stuff may be flying around in my workshop i dont plan on it but stuff happens
    as to the carb overflowing this can often be caused by the rubber tip on the float needle becoming hard and no longer sealing often leaves a small indentation around where the needle has previously seated with modern fuels 8 to 10 years is about the best you can expect from the float needle but should be part of any rebuild kit
    if your tank is rusty get a tank liner repair kit i have done a few of these and have had one still good after 5 years

    Tank Liner Repair Kit - Harley Davidson Community

    Brian
     
  9. Jack Klarich

    Jack Klarich Expert Member

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  10. Bodeen

    Bodeen Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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