Broke down !!

Discussion in 'Transmission' started by Melroy, Oct 25, 2008.

  1. Melroy

    Melroy Account Removed

    10
    0
    0
    I have a '93 Dyna Lowrider. Was riding at about 45 mph in 5th gear when this horrrible noise started. Pulled over and no matter what gear I put it in, there is this horrible grinding noise and the bike will not move. When the clutch is in, everything sounds fine. Engine sounds great. The belt is still on and I pulled the primary case and all looks good in there. The noise is definetly coming from the powertrain and not the wheels.

    Question: Is it possible that the belt drive (transmission) sprocket might have stripped or something? Or could it be ??????

    I'm debating to buy a clutch compresssing tool so I can pull the primary case or take the bike in for repair. (I have lots more time than money) If it's not the sprocket I'm cooked, as transmission work is above my skill level.

    Thanks for any help.
     
  2. glider

    glider Veteran Member

    25,464
    108
    44
    My bet would be the compensating sprocket.
     
  3. Melroy

    Melroy Account Removed

    10
    0
    0
    Tried turning it by hand etc. it's not loose or anything. But, I have nothing to loose by pulling it apart. Any suggestions for getting the clutch off without buying a special comperssing tool as the book says to remove compensating sprocket and clutch at the same time. Do I really need to remove the clutch?

    Does this tool just compress the clutch to get the retaining ring off or does it actually hold the clutch together? If it's just to get the ring off, I can fabricate something but, the book strongly warns about trying to remove the clutch without one.

    First time is always the hardest, but it's always the most rewarding. :) Thanks for the help.
     
  4. Fisher

    Fisher Account Removed

    341
    0
    1
    You do not have to disassemble the clutch to remove it.You remove the retaining ring (replace with new-always) that holds the adjuster plate to the center.Remove the 1 3/16" nut behind it-oh and it's a reverse/left hand thread.What I'd do first is without the engine running put it in gear and try to push the bike.Much easier to find where the noise is cioming from that way.You will need something to remove the two nuts (clutch and comp sprocket) that stops the primary from turning.I've used a small piece of wood.Always loosen the primary tensioner all the way and insert the wood at the top of the chain run to avoid breaking expensive parts.
     
  5. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

    4,630
    68
    99
    See what Fisher says above. You just remove the nut holding the clutch basket (lefty threads), and the big nut holding the drive sprocket/compensator at the front. DO NOT USE IMPACT WRENCHES on either nut.

    But, why are you trying to take this stuff off right now? At this point, it does not sound like you have isolated the problem, and with that stuff off, you may not be able to get things to turn.

    Check the obvious first. Nothing like a rock or something jammed in somewhere so that when the bike is moving it grinds? Look around the brake rotors and calipers, and in the belt guard area. Where ever you have turning parts where some road trash or some bike part could get trapped and be rubbing. If this is it, done!

    Drain the primary, and take off the outer primary cover. Put the bike on a lift, and the bike in neutral. For safety sake, you should probably disconnect the battery ground (negative). Turn the back tire by hand and see what you hear. If nothing, put it in gear and try again. You may need it in a lower gear to be able to turn it, and it will help if the plugs are out.

    What did you find out? Sound coming from the compensator when the bike is in neutral, or from the tranny when in gear?

    Let us know.

    TQ
     
  6. Melroy

    Melroy Account Removed

    10
    0
    0
    Thank you so much for the helpful advice.

    Right now I'm stalled until later today when I can borrow a six sided 1 1/2 in. socket for the compensator nut instead of using my old sloppy 24 pt. BUT, I think I have isolated the problem. I put the bike in gear and with the old sloppy socket, turned the sprocket, and I could see the transmission sprocket behind the inner case and that is where the noise is comming from. The shaft turns inside the sprocket but the sprocket doesn't turn. It will move slightly, then the shaft just turns and I hear the noise.

    At this point, my best hope is that the ID teeth on the sprocket stripped and not the transmission shaft.

    How long do the belts last. It looks good, but was wondering since I will have most everyting apart, about changing it now. Yet, I'm not excited about spending another $200. Bike has 55,000 miles on it......mostly highway miles.

    This forum is great !!!!
     
  7. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

    4,630
    68
    99
    Whoa! I hope you are right. Hard to believe that it could have happened (stipping out the pulley). That would mean that the pulley was stopped while the tranny drive shaft was still turning, or vice versa. It would have been a pretty traumatic event. Anything like that happen?

    To remove the pulley, do you have the book (HD Factory Service Manual - '93 Low Rider)? Follow those instructions carefully.

    On the belt, see this:

    Belts And Pulleys - Harley Davidson Community

    As long as a careful inspection of the belt while you have it off the bike shows it to be in good condition, IMHO you can reuse it. If you have damaged teeth, then replace it. If it craps out on you, you have to pull the inner primary again and the rear wheel to replace it.
     
  8. Melroy

    Melroy Account Removed

    10
    0
    0
    For some reason I couldn't sign on to the forum for a couple of days. I want to thank everyone for the advice and support.

    It was the tranny sprocket afterall. I took offf the inner primary case and the sprocket nut almost fell off. For some reason it jumped the retainer plate and spun loose, which caused the sprocket to strip.

    I took it to a local independent mechanic who said he's seen a number of sprockets strip, but never one that had the nut back off. So, with a new sprocket, seals, etc....and the support of the good folks on this forum, I'm back in business.

    The mechanic tried to talk me into going from a 32T sprocket to a 34T. He said it would really help on the top end. But, I decided against it as I avoid the freeways with a passion and do 90% of my riding in the hills on two lane highways where I'm not going over 55-60 anyway and the bike runs at 28-3000 rpms.

    Thanks again to everyone.