Aches and Pains After a Long Day

Discussion in 'Touring Models' started by Dr. Dolittle, Jun 9, 2008.

  1. Dr. Dolittle

    Dr. Dolittle Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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    I realize a "long day" is a relative thing but I did 500 miles over two days last week which is a lot for a newbie like me! Looking for feedback and suggestions in a couple areas:

    1) Late in the first day and most of the second day I was getting some butt numbness and lower back stiffness. I do have lumbar issues treated by stretching, yoga, chiropractor visits, and ibuprofen but then I'm old and stiff most of the time anyway. I could move around on the bike a bit and get the symptoms to lessen but they never went away 100%. Would an upgraded seat and/or backrest really help this out?

    2) Tingling and numbness in the hands and an achy pain in the inner part of my elbows. I don't think it's carpal tunnel since I can work at the computer for extended periods without this happening. This happened on my Sportster but I attributed that to its vibrations in the handlebars. Would different bars resulting in a different seating position help the elbows? Something like the Kuryakyn ISO grips for the hands?

    I don't mean to imply that it was a miserable ride. On the contrary, I had a blast. I'm just looking for some improvements in these areas so I can enjoy days like this more often and do them back to back without having to get a full body massage afterwards. On the other hand.....
     
  2. Derekj

    Derekj Member

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    There are 3 things that affect your comfort....hands,butt and feet. A change of seat may help but may also increase you discomfort if it promotes your stresses. I normally get my customers to sit on a bike with their eyes closed and get them to grip imaginary bars, and not to reach out to where they think the bars are, but to reach out to where thaey are comfortable.
    This would then be my starting point. Do you sit straight naturaly, or slump...as this will also affect your feet location as if you slouch , your feet would naturaly move back compared to a more upright position. A backrest is always great on the road, as it helps reduce the pressure on your lower back as well as your grip and arms allowing you to relax and fit in another 500 miles without a blink...
    Good luck figuring it all out.
     
  3. TXMikey

    TXMikey Junior Member

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    Doc, I have very similar back issues. A rider backrest definitely helps. The stock seat is still causing pain in my low back, and I'm hoping a different seat will help. I had a Mustang seat on my last bike, and it was definitely an improvement over that bike's OEM seat, but I wasn't as impressed as some have been. Is the numbness in your right hand? I have carpal problems in mine, and can work on the computer all day with no problems. One thing that helps me is a "Crampbuster" on the throttle. They cost about $10-$15, and slip on. You can rest the palm of your hand on it, relax your grip, and still maintain your throttle settings.
     
  4. Dr. Dolittle

    Dr. Dolittle Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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    Definitely the right hand more than the left. I put the Kuryakyn ISO grips with the "throttle boss" on my Sportster. I think this throttle boss works on the same theory as your "crampbuster." It helped some but I never took this long a trip on my Sporty. Did you put the crampbuster over the stock grips or did you upgrade them first? Thanks for your help!

    Too weird. I'm on vacation now but I was just thinking that when I got home, this is exactly what I was going to do. I know, I probably should have figured this out sooner but this was my first long distance, extended day trip on this bike. Hopefully my natural position will be pretty close. Sounds like the backrest is a must from everyone's posts! That will be priority number one.

    Back to the bars and the sitting position. I've heard the market is still pretty limited on handlebars for the 2008 Touring class because of the electronic throttle. True or is it improving?

    Thanks for your input!
     
  5. Flashback

    Flashback Active Member

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    I'm in my mid 50's and have some back issues myself. I just did 800 miles in one day 13 and a half hours and ws fine just tired. The trick is to take a break when you start to get a little numb, get of and have a coke or whatever and stay off for 15 minutes or so then you should be good to go again. At least works for me. As to your hands the best investment I ever made was when I had them add a cruise control to my glide. If yours is available to have one added DO IT! that way you can rest your hands and stretch your arms as needed as you go down the highway makes a huge difference. Can't really comment on the seat since i use the stock 08 glide seat..
     
  6. Derekj

    Derekj Member

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    I maybe wrong, but I don't think the electronic throttle will be a problem as the wires can be extended. The Drag Fatbook has a few options. I was always a straight bar kinda rider and have now realised that the older I get the sorer it becomes. I installed 16" narrow apes on my road king and now I get to ride all day long with no back pain. After so many years of rugby,as hooker, I thought I'd never get to ride for longer than 5-6 hundred miles, but will my backrest, apes and foot pegs, it's all a reality.Now for tunes.....
     
  7. Dr. Dolittle

    Dr. Dolittle Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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    Thanks. My Street Glide came with cruise but I only use it on limited access, interstate type roads and I was hardly ever on them for this trip. Took plenty of breaks, too.
     
  8. TXMikey

    TXMikey Junior Member

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    I agree with Flashback on the cruise. I use mine anytime it appears there will be an extended length at a given speed, even if it's on surface streets. Makes a big difference on how the hand feels. All it takes is a quick roll off of the throttle to disengage and have full manual control again.

    On the crampbuster, it fits over the stock grips. Here's a link so you can see what they are.

    J CrampBuster

    If the link doesn't work, you can go to jpcycles.com and do a search for "crampbuster". They're actually listed in their metric catalog.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2008
  9. SeaRider04

    SeaRider04 Active Member

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    How does the "crampbuster" works?.
     
  10. Dr. Dolittle

    Dr. Dolittle Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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    crampbuster.com has a good video showing the installation and operation. Similar to the "throttle boss" on Kuryakyn grips but not permanently installed and about $60 cheaper.