88B or 96B upgrade to Screaming Eagle II/III

Discussion in 'Engine, Fuel and Exhaust' started by Monolith, May 12, 2009.

  1. Monolith

    Monolith Member

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    If I am going to install a Screaming Eagle II or III does it matter if I start with an 88B or a 96B engine? Won't they both end up pretty much the same?
     
  2. Monolith

    Monolith Member

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    I am a newbie, so your response helps :)

    If you install a Screaming Eagle Stage III on a 88b you end up with the same motor roughly that is now default, the 96B?

    -Monolith
     
  3. dolt

    dolt Senior Member Contributor

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    Yes and no. If you start with 88" you end up with 95" configured with 3.875" bore x 4.00" stroke. The 96" engine is configured with a 3.750" bore x 4.375" stroke. Two ways to arrive at a similar displacement with slightly different performance characterisitics.
     
  4. Gary0155

    Gary0155 Member

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    this is soething im also looking into. Whats everyones opinions on if its worth the money or not?
     
  5. Monolith

    Monolith Member

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    Yeah I am convinced, I will have to dump by 2006 for a 2010 in Sept.
     
  6. dolt

    dolt Senior Member Contributor

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    Not sure if what is worth the money? If you are comparing the cost of upgrading a TC88 to 95" to the cost of purchasing a TC96; there is no comparison. I would never suggest going the SE route for the upgrade but for about $2500, you can put together a very strong, well mannered and depandable 95" that will smoke any Stage I TC96 you come across and will run with the CV 110s. You just need to know what components work well to get you there but it's not that hard to do. The TCs love to spin and don't need a six speed, unless you are a touring guy and log many highway miles every year. If folks are honest about their use of the six speed, they don't spend much time in that gear.

    I confess, I am biased; partial to the earlier TC models. If I had an early model that I was happy with and just wanted more performance, I would upgrade rather than buy new. But, like Smitty, my program might not be for everyone.
     
  7. jonny oz

    jonny oz Member

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    step 1: stay away from the dealer and their screamin eagle (low) performance packages.

    step 2: research, research, research, find a reputable builder that offers performance packages (headwork, cylinder bore, cam, etc)

    an independent shop that has experience building engines will select a combination of components that will work well together and fit your riding style, and your end result will be a reliable, powerful engine that will cost you less and make more power than an SE kit.

    if you are going to upgrade your engine, it's necessary to "do it all" in order to get good performance gains. if you just do a 95" big bore to your 88, the power will increase, but not by a whole lot. If you do a complete engine build, power gains will be drastic.

    it's a good idea to google search this topic and read as much as you can. there's lots and lots of info out there, and it feels really good after you learn about this stuff, you can make informed decisions and know what you're getting and be confident that you're getting what you want.
     
  8. dolt

    dolt Senior Member Contributor

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    I understand that going the SE route may make more sense when you add the cost to ship in aftermarket parts but don't kid yourself about how the SE packages will perform.

    It is hard to find dynos of SE103 or SE110s. I suppose that is because when compared with aftemarket builds, they are nothing to boast about. I have yet to see a 103 that makes 120/120; ain't happening;maybe with N2O. 110TQ/90HP is about the average. As for a 110 that makes 130/130; that's not happening either; 120TQ/115HP is about the average for those. The garden variety 95"/96" builds these days will make right at100HP/100+TQ; no brainer. There more sophisticated builds of the same displacement that make 115HP/TQ. These build are dependable, well mannered and a hoot to ride. You just have to know what cams work with what heads and intake/exhaust. A good fuel management system and tuner also helps for the EFI models.

    Check the dyno charts in the '08 or '09 SE catalog; there are charts there for every SE combination available from the MoCo; you won't see any that make the numbers you refer to. The few folks I know that are overseas and ride Harleys, offset the shipping cost by doing their own work and saving the labor cost.