1991 Lowrider

Discussion in 'FXR Models' started by Lancer, May 18, 2009.

  1. Lancer

    Lancer Junior Member

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    Hi Guy's,
    I have a line on a 1991 Lowrider. It has 30k miles, has not been ridden for a couple years. I have seen the bike, but is not running at this time. The owner was told that it needs new cylinder base gaskets. (there is oil seepage at the cylinder base) It is an EVO engine. Is this a common issue with these engines/bikes, or is this a major sign to stay away. The guy is asking 5k for the bike as is, (he estimates 1k worth of work to fix) is this a fair price? I am willing and able to do what repairs are needed myself. Cosmetically the bike looks pretty good, needs a little TLC. Comes with detachable windshield and saddle bags. This will be my wifes second bike when she outgrows her Virago 750. Comments? Snap it up, or run like a raped ape?

    Thanks

    Lancer
     
  2. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    Price sounds fair. The weeping base gaskets are a common thing on the EVO motors, usually from improper warm up time before riding. Keep in mind that the entire cylinder and head assemblies must be remover to replace the gaskets. I would try to offer less money based on the fact of the repair costs to replace the gaskets if they are leaking badly and you can't do it yourself. As far as the rest of the bike, I would prefer to hear it run before buying it.
    Also take into consideration the condition of tires etc and being it hasn't been ridden, any problems from sitting like the carb etc being varnished up needing an overhaul.
     
  3. Lancer

    Lancer Junior Member

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    I thought about the carb too, he says he is about to drain the gas from the tank, charge the battery, fresh fuel and crank it up. I have heard the carb should be pulled and cleaned at a minimum. At our club we have a guy who did that to his bike and it is apparently now really messed up.
     
  4. glider

    glider Veteran Member

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    There's a bit more than just pulling things apart, there knowledge of the working of the carb to do it properly. I would let him get the fuel drained and refilled and then judge the condition as another bargaining point if you are interested in the bike. Carbs if not repairable can be gotten reasonably but must be figured into the purchasing price in the event that it needs replacing instead of rebuilding. The owner can't dispute this if the bike hasn't been run or ridden in a few years unless it was properly stored and still things like tires etc deteriorate.
     
  5. fin_676

    fin_676 Experienced Member Staff Member Moderator Contributor

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    Having replaced the cylinder base gasket on a couple of evo engines its not an unusual occurrence
    some of the aftermarket gaskets are said to be of better quality and should prevent it happening again
    worst part of the job is getting the old gasket off
    if you get the bike and do the work yourself get new gaskets for the rocker box and cylinder head as well
    you may find that the lower rocker gasket is a single rather than a pair and metal rather than paper much better gasket
    you may also find that the head gasket is different requiring the removal of the o rings from the oil ways
    get a service manual both hd and clymer cover this equally well
    take you time and make sure you match the old and new gaskets to make sure they are the same or you account for the differences
    hope this helps

    Brian
     
  6. Lancer

    Lancer Junior Member

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    Thanks for the info guy's

    Lancer
     
  7. TQuentin1

    TQuentin1 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator

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    I have this bike's sister model in the '91 FXDB-s. I love the bike. Very simple. No electronics unless you put some on (like electronic ignition - good idea!). Since the bike has sat for a while, if you get it, go through it head to toe. Take the fuel system completely apart. Replace the tank valve/strainer (I like the Pingel. See here: Pingel Power-Flo Fuel Valve Positions). Clean the tank out completely. If it is real trashed inside, take it to someone to have it slurry washed or something else to remove the loose stuff. Replace all the hoses (cross over, carburetor supply, float bowl drain). Take the carburetor completely apart and soak all the metal parts in solvent (like mineral spirits) to soften everything up. Then scrub with an old toothbrush. Chase all the orifices with carb cleaner. Reassemble with new orings, and seals. Jet based on the info in here:

    Fuel and Carb Related Issues - Harley Davidson Community

    Change the fluids using this as a guide:

    Oil Suggestions For Harleys - Harley Davidson Community

    Before you put the engine oil and tranny gear lube back in, drop the pan and clean it out good.

    You may need to change out the lifters, but run it a bit to see if you are gonna want a new cam. At that point, lifters, cam, adjustable pushrods.

    Since you have to do base gaskets, do the top end: valve job, rings, and hone cylinders. Stick new bushings in anywhere you find some.

    Check the shoe on the primary chain tensioner. Check the clutch friction plates.

    Have the battery SLOW charged and then load tested.

    The one thing I strongly recommend on this bike is a Carlini Torque Arm or equivalent. These bikes have the engine and the tranny hanging on the inner primary. It takes a beating with these two beasts trying to twist and turn it! The Torque Arm forms a nice solid box that really cuts the inner primary a break.

    Talking about brakes (ha ha ha!) check the pads, and then flush the old fluid out really well and then bleed. See here:

    Brakes, Tires and Wheels - Harley Davidson Community

    Finally, change out the fork oil. Easy on these bikes.

    Good to go with a know commodity! Enjoy!!

    TQ